Very trivial query. How many consonants have you seen in a name? 
Posted: 11 February 2013 08:31 AM   [ Ignore ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  236
Joined  2007-02-23

We were watching movie by Krzysztof Kieslowski and the wife mused, ‘How many consonants have you seen in one name?’

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 05:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  315
Joined  2007-02-17

’Knightsbridge’ has six in a row.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 06:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4658
Joined  2007-01-03

There is Mister Mxyztplk from the Superman oeuvre, although that’s a fictional name.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 06:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  246
Joined  2007-02-16

A little googling found these. Not all are placenames or English though.

These are sixes:
AARRGHHS [OSPD], ARCHCHRONICLER, BERGSCHRUND, BORSCHTS, CATCHPHRASE, DORFSCHNEIDER (a surname), ESCHSCHOLTZIA (a genus of poppies), FESTSCHRIFT, FLIGHTSTRIP, FRUCHTSCHIEFER, HANTZSCHIA (genus of diatom), HERTZSPRUNG-RUSSELL DIAGRAM, KAMPSCHROEDER (a surname), KIRSCHSTEINITE, KNIGHTSBRIDGE (a district in London), KOBITZSCHWALDE (a place name in Saxony), KOTZSCHMAR (a surname), KRETZSCHMAR or KRETZSCHMER (a surname), LACHSSCHINKEN, LATCHSTRING, LENGTHSMAN, MALITZSCHKENDORF (a place name in Saxony), MISCHSPRACHE, NACHSCHLAG, POSTPHTHISIC, SIGHTSCREEN, TSKTSKING, VELDTSCHOEN, WATCHSTRAP, WELTSCHMERZ

These are sevens:
HIRSCHSPRUNG’S DISEASE (OED2), SCHTSCHI (variant of shchi, OED2), and TSKTSKS (OSPD3), TSINAMDZGHVRIANT’KARI (a Georgian village), SCHTSCHUROWSKIA (a genus of umbellifer), NIMPTSCHDORF (a place name in Moravia), and the name Angelika KIRCHSCHLAGER

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 06:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  246
Joined  2007-02-16

Even more trivial – Istanbul has two continents!

(Incidently, that was Mal aprop of nothing)

[ Edited: 12 February 2013 06:45 AM by Skibberoo ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 07:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3026
Joined  2007-02-26

Wolfe­schlegelstein­hausenberger­dorffvoraltern­waren­gewissenhaft­schaferswessen­schafewaren­wohlgepflege­und­sorgfaltigkeit­beschutzen­von­angreifen­durch­ihrraubgierigfeinde­welche­voraltern­zwolftausend­jahres­vorandieerscheinen­wander­ersteer­dem­enschderraumschiff­gebrauchlicht­als­sein­ursprung­von­kraftgestart­sein­lange­fahrt­hinzwischen­sternartigraum­auf­der­suchenach­diestern­welche­gehabt­bewohnbar­planeten­kreise­drehen­sich­und­wohin­der­neurasse­von­verstandigmen­schlichkeit­konnte­fortplanzen­und­sicher­freuen­anlebens­langlich­freude­und­ruhe­mit­nicht­ein­furcht­vor­angreifen­von­anderer­intelligent­geschopfs­von­hinzwischen­sternartigraum has hundreds of consonants.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1971
Joined  2007-02-19

My Uncle Herbert’s family had four continents and one incontinent (he was O.K. most of the time, but tended to lose control after one or two over the eight)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 February 2013 10:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  246
Joined  2007-02-16

For those quart behind Lionello’s eight-ball and unfamiliar with pints, this may help:  http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/271100.html

PS I was about to add that, ‘after the 8th drink one probably doesn’t care a continental.’

However, this caused me to question how the familiar expression, “I don’t care a continental,’ came about. 
For the curious see: http://mess1.homestead.com/Nineteenth_Century_Slang_Dictionary.pdf (under ‘Continental’)

[ Edited: 12 February 2013 10:50 PM by Skibberoo ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 February 2013 04:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1161
Joined  2007-02-14

We’ve got to beware of Y’s in these examples.  For fictional names I’ll go along with Bftsplk if we’re going for a high consonant to vowel ratio.  He was a character in Al Capp’s Li’l Abner.  He was always traveling around with a rain cloud over his head.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 February 2013 04:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3026
Joined  2007-02-26

The one I gave isn’t a fictional name…

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 February 2013 04:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1161
Joined  2007-02-14

As far as phonemes go, Krzysztof only has five that are consonants.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 February 2013 11:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  246
Joined  2007-02-16

If one allows that ‘y’ is not a vowel then the placename “Kyrgyzstan” has eight uninterrupted consonants in a row.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 February 2013 03:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1971
Joined  2007-02-19

"Y” may sometimes be a consonant in English, but I think that in that country it wouldn’t be.  Disallowed.

(actually, even in English, the letter “Y” functions as a vowel in “Kyrgyzstan” --- doesn’t it?)

I would look for multi-consonant words in Czech. The Czech language seems to be wonderfully sparing with vowels.

Or Cymraeg. What about Llanfairpwll.... and similar names?

[ Edited: 18 February 2013 03:14 PM by lionello ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 February 2013 07:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  811
Joined  2007-06-20

Except that w (pronounced “oo” in Welsh) is a vowel too. Otherwise the Welsh for ‘beer”, cwrw, would be a vowel-less mess.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 February 2013 09:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1258
Joined  2007-03-21
Zythophile - 19 February 2013 07:55 AM

Except that w (pronounced “oo” in Welsh) is a vowel too. Otherwise the Welsh for ‘beer”, cwrw, would be a vowel-less mess.

It does in English as well. In words like “Brown” and “cow” the existence of the W signifies a diphthong: “ah” plus “oo”. Also in the word “drew”, though not a diphthong, just a straight “oo” sound. I wonder whether this use of “w” as a vowel (or to represent a vowel sound) is a Welsh inheritance. In the etymology for the adjective “brown” in the OED, for example, every language shown as the word’s ancestor uses the “u” to represent what we use the “w” for (German braun).  Phoneticists would understand this better than I.

One of my favorite hymn tunes is CWM RHONDA, pronounced, of course, coom.

[ Edited: 19 February 2013 09:13 AM by Oecolampadius ]
Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ HD: Beowulf MS is Now Online      Pogey ››