BL: creek, up a creek
Posted: 28 March 2013 04:54 AM   [ Ignore ]
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With or without a paddle.

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Posted: 28 March 2013 07:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Huh.
I had never picked that up. Is it a common word in the UK?

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Posted: 28 March 2013 12:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Not hugely common, but certainly when we do use it we mean ‘inlet’, not the branch of a stream.

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Posted: 24 April 2013 05:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Indeed: you only get (BrE) creeks on the coasts of Britain, in salt marshes, tidal sections of rivers and the like, and my understanding (which may be completely wrong) is that something is a creek when it is an inlet formed by the force of the tide against the shore or riparian edges, rather than being a stream in its own right, that is, a channel carved by water that fell as rain.

[ Edited: 24 April 2013 07:06 AM by Zythophile ]
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Posted: 24 April 2013 06:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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The word riparian will ever remind me of Hyacinth Bucket.

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Posted: 24 April 2013 07:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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"The phrase is originally up shit creek, first recorded, believe it or not, in the Secretary of War’s 1868 annual report to Congress”: you might mention who the Secretary of War was.

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Posted: 24 April 2013 07:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I’m not sure who it was, Stanton or Schofield. The office changed hands in 1868, and I’m not sure which one authored the report.

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