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Apostrophe
Posted: 04 April 2013 04:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Dave Wilton - 03 April 2013 03:48 PM
This is the problem with calling it the “possessive” case, people tend to think that’s all it does. More accurately, it’s the “genitive” case as it does more than denote possession. It is used to denote an association or a specific identification, such as origin (e.g., America’s soldiers), agent of an action (e.g., a mother’s love), or composition (e.g., the violin’s strings), as well as alienable possession (e.g., Dave’s computer) and inalienable possession (Dave’s existence).

I have been a member of this group since the EZboard days, and this part of Dave’s explanation is the single most illuminating (to me) post. Thank you.

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Posted: 04 April 2013 07:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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There’s glory for you, Dave, as Humpty Dumpty would have said. 

;-)

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Posted: 10 April 2013 01:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Apropos the comestible merchant’s punctuation predilection I couldn’t help but note the following usage in a report on a certain Iron Lady’s demise:

“Margaret Thatcher, the grocer’s daughter and mother of modern conservatism, had her faults, heaven knows. The New Yorker’s John Cassidy called her a combination of Ronald Reagan, Ayn Rand and Dr. Strangelove. François Mitterrand said she had the eyes of Caligula and the mouth of Marilyn Monroe.”

BTW, another paper, given the subject lady’s popular sobriquet, used this headline, “May she Rust in Peace.”

;-)

OPT’s next post tells me my poor attempt at humo(u)r has misfired. I was reporting on an example of the correct use of the grocer’s apostrophe being found in the wild, so to speak. 

See http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/jul/08/books.booksnews

[ Edited: 10 April 2013 02:07 AM by Skibberoo ]
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Posted: 10 April 2013 01:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Apropos the comestible merchant’s punctuation predilection I couldn’t help but note the following usage in a report on a certain Iron Lady’s demise:

“Margaret Thatcher, the grocer’s daughter and mother of modern conservatism, had her faults, heaven knows. The New Yorker’s John Cassidy called her a combination of Ronald Reagan, Ayn Rand and Dr. Strangelove. François Mitterrand said she had the eyes of Caligula and the mouth of Marilyn Monroe.”

Mekong fuse. Which usage?

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Posted: 10 April 2013 02:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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OP Tipping - 10 April 2013 01:41 AM

Apropos the comestible merchant’s punctuation predilection I couldn’t help but note the following usage in a report on a certain Iron Lady’s demise:

“Margaret Thatcher, the grocer’s daughter and mother of modern conservatism, had her faults, heaven knows. The New Yorker’s John Cassidy called her a combination of Ronald Reagan, Ayn Rand and Dr. Strangelove. François Mitterrand said she had the eyes of Caligula and the mouth of Marilyn Monroe.”

Mekong fuse. Which usage?

I would suspect the one in “grocer’s”.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 03:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Okay, but that’s a perfectly conventional use of an apostrophe.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 03:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Don’t get it, either.  Why did you draw attention to the report, skibs, if not for apostrophe usage?  However feeble the joke, I need an explanation.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 06:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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If the timestamps are anything to go by, Skibs provided one (in his edit) even before your request.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 09:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Ah, thanks.  I missed that.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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@Skib: [rubs temples and exhales]

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Posted: 24 May 2013 06:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Slate writer Matthew Malady reports the following

anyone who has enjoyed Cormac McCarthy’s The Road has displayed an expert-level capacity to look beyond seemingly variable apostrophe usage. (In a 2007 interview with Oprah Winfrey, McCarthy told her, “There’s no reason to blot the page up with weird little marks.”)

I read the book and didn’t even notice. Probably because I was terrified throughout.
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Posted: 24 May 2013 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Worth reading?

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Posted: 24 May 2013 07:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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OP Tipping - 24 May 2013 06:51 PM

Worth reading?

It was a great read. And it has shaped my most recent nightmares which involved some sort of cross between it and the Masque of the Red Death..

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