Disgruntled
Posted: 09 April 2013 08:42 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I think it was in Wodehouse that I came across a jocular use of gruntled and I always thought it was simply a gag on PGs part. Which of course it was, but now I find that there is indeed a gruntle, behind disgruntled, although sadly it does not have the meaning that Wodehouse playfully ascribed to it.

disgruntle, v.

Etymology:  < dis- prefix 1e + gruntle v. frequentative of grunt n.

trans. To put into sulky dissatisfaction or ill-humour; to chagrin, disgust. Chiefly in pa. pple.

1682 H. Care Hist. Popery IV. 79 Hodge was a little disgruntled at that Inscription.

gruntle, v.

Etymology:  < grunt v. with diminutive or frequentative ending -le suffix.

1. intr. To utter a little or low grunt. Said of swine, occas. of other animals; rarely of persons. Const. against, at. Obs. exc. dial.

c1400 Mandeville’s Trav. (Roxb.) xxx. 135 Þai..spekez noȝt, bot gruntils as swyne duse.

2. To grumble, murmur, complain.

1591 R. Bruce Serm. Edinb. i. sig. B4, It becommeth vs not to haue our hearts heir gruntling vpon this earth.

Grunt BTW is, unsurprisingly, echoic in origin and was originally descriptive of the sound a hog makes.

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Posted: 09 April 2013 04:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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As one who has often had his or her gruntle removed, I sympathize.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 09:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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As a poor, OED-deprived soul, I stumbled a bit as to what sense “1e” of “dis” is.  From the context, my best guess was that that sense of “dis-” meant “put into a state of”, “induce”, “generate”, or the like.  I couldn’t think of another example of “dis-” being used that way, but that, of course, hardly proves it couldn’t play such a function in some constructions.

Per dictionary.com, “dis-”, in “disgruntle”, is being used in the sense of “totally, utterly”.  Does that accord with the OED’s take on what “dis-” means here?

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Posted: 10 April 2013 09:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Yes, it’s an intensifier, not a privative.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 12:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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are there other words in which “dis-” is used in this way?

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Posted: 10 April 2013 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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MW has disannul.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 01:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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To elaborate on what donkeyhotay wrote, the OED says, “With [Latin] verbs having already a sense of division, solution, separation, or undoing, the addition of dis- was naturally intensive, ‘away, out and out, utterly, exceedingly’.... In the same way, English has several verbs in which dis- adds intensity to words having already a sense of undoing, as in disalter, disaltern, disannul.”

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Posted: 10 April 2013 07:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I suppose wolves would be unbayed and cows disallowed.

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Posted: 16 April 2013 03:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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dissolve, dissolution
Most common example I can think of

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