Nookie
Posted: 13 April 2013 02:35 PM   [ Ignore ]
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How far back can we trace nookie, meaning a sexual encounter, in American English?

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Posted: 13 April 2013 07:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Via google books, U. S. A. [trilogy], part I, The 42nd Parallel, by John Dos Passos, Modern Library/Random House, 1930, p. 390:

... He wished
he had the jack to buy a motorbike himself and go on a
trip somewhere. Last night he’d tried to argue Hendriks
into going South with him, but Hendriks said he’d picked
up with a skirt that was a warm baby and he was getting
his nookie every night and going to stay right with it.
To hell with all that, thought Charley; I want to see
some country....

There is also this:

books?id=b65rAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA370&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U1p671g5JktLsqEexgzFaj_mhmYgA&ci=185,602,674,255&edge=0

From Psychoanalysis: Its Theories and Practical Application by Abraham Arden Brill, W. B. Saunders Co., [1912] 1922 revised edition, p. 370.

[ Edited: 13 April 2013 08:09 PM by sobiest ]
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Posted: 13 April 2013 10:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I think you meant your last link to be this, from the same book which I can see only in snippet view:

… was a symbol for the penis.  This symbol did not have to be explained to him.  He attended a boys’ school where the boys used to refer to the penis as “nookie”.  This neologism stood for “new key” and was well known to all the boys. The bloody key and keyhole correspond to the early conception of the female genitals as ...

There’s also this, from Anarchy Collective (Great Britain), Paul Avrich Collection (Library of Congress) - 1917 - Snippet view:

… to have very modest goals for society and myself, things like clean air and water, green grass, children with bright eyes, not being pushed around, useful work that suits one’s abilities, plain tasty food, and occasional satisfactory nookie.

The meaning isn’t explained, however.

edited in further quote

[ Edited: 13 April 2013 10:58 PM by ElizaD ]
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Posted: 14 April 2013 02:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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ElizaD - 13 April 2013 10:46 PM

I think you meant your last link to be this, from the same book which I can see only in snippet view:

… was a symbol for the penis.  This symbol did not have to be explained to him.  He attended a boys’ school where the boys used to refer to the penis as “nookie”.  This neologism stood for “new key” and was well known to all the boys. The bloody key and keyhole correspond to the early conception of the female genitals as ...

...

It should have been that. Perhaps you are unable to see the clip/picture of that very text I posted? And the very last link should have been a link to that book at the page bearing the same text.

There was an earlier post by lionello on another thread, dated 16 September 2010 04:43 PM that touched on this word:

lionello - 16 September 2010 06:43 AM

Could there be any connection between the Dutch word neuken (mentioned several times in this thread) and the English slang word “nookie”?  Is anything known about the etymology of “nookie”?

Edit: should have remembered to look up first, ask afterward. In “OneLook Dictionary Search”, the origin is variously described as “recent”, “early 20th century” (could have been picked up by English soldiers on the continent during WW1). Several dictionaries, including Etymology Online, suggest neuken as the origin of “nookie” ; Wikipedia suggests an alternative origin in Cockney rhyming slang for the vagina (nook and cranny = fanny).

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Posted: 14 April 2013 03:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Note that Google Books is inconsistent about what it displays depending on the country one is in. Those in the US have many more books available in full text view than do those in other countries. The full book is available via the Internet Archive. It’s referring to schoolboy slang c. 1895. The “new key” explanation sounds like a post hoc rationalization of an unfamiliar term by the psychiatrist.

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Posted: 14 April 2013 04:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thank you, all.  I’m inclined to let it stand.  It’s from a novel my wife and I are copy-editing.  It’s in a conversation a bunch of teen-aged boys are having about some college junior girls in the year, I believe, 1925.

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Posted: 14 April 2013 09:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Dave Wilton - 14 April 2013 03:46 AM

Note that Google Books is inconsistent about what it displays depending on the country one is in…

I need to remember this and make more universal cite selections in the future.

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