Speaking of quotes: Veni vidi vici
Posted: 24 May 2013 04:13 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have been led to believe that Caesar would not have said this in Latin, but in Greek.  What brand of Greek would he have used?

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Posted: 24 May 2013 04:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The same with Et tu, Brute which would have been, or so I’ve been led to believe, And you, my son also in Greek.

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Posted: 24 May 2013 05:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Faldage - 24 May 2013 04:13 AM

I have been led to believe that Caesar would not have said this in Latin, but in Greek.  What brand of Greek would he have used?

I would have doubts about this, but not from any special historical or linguistic expertise.  It’s just that, in Greek, the phrase is not an alliteration, and therefore not interesting or memorable.

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Posted: 24 May 2013 05:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Faldage - 24 May 2013 04:13 AM

I have been led to believe that Caesar would not have said this in Latin, but in Greek.  What brand of Greek would he have used?

Since he is supposed to have written this to the Senate, can we not presume that it would have been in Latin?

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Posted: 24 May 2013 01:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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It was in Latin. Plutarch in his Life of Julius Caesar says he wrote it to his friend Amantius, and makes a comment about how his Greek translation of the phrase doesn’t convey the eloquence and brevity of the Latin. Suetonius reports that the phrase was used as an inscription in his triumph, in which case we can assume it was in Latin, which was used for all such formal occasions.

Plutarch reports “Let the die be cast” was in Greek, which makes sense as Caesar was quoting a play by Menander.

As for his last words, if he spoke them, Suetonius says they were in Greek as Faldage says.

[ Edited: 24 May 2013 01:35 PM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 24 May 2013 06:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Faldage - 24 May 2013 04:13 AM

I have been led to believe that Caesar would not have said this in Latin, but in Greek.  What brand of Greek would he have used?

As a matter of interest, what was it that led you to believe that.

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Posted: 24 May 2013 08:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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OP Tipping - 24 May 2013 06:45 PM

Faldage - 24 May 2013 04:13 AM
I have been led to believe that Caesar would not have said this in Latin, but in Greek.  What brand of Greek would he have used?

As a matter of interest, what was it that led you to believe that.

Something I read once long ago.  By now it’s just a scrap of paper with faded writing in my Junk Drawer Memory®.

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