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What’s Different in Canada
Posted: 04 June 2013 10:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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I love Data: he says what he means, and means what he says. Not like a human at all.

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Posted: 04 June 2013 10:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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What you lot (UK/US) understand by a ‘sliver’, we, in southern Scotland, call a ‘spail’.

The dialect word for a splinter in my part of the north east of England is “speld”.  And the Afrikaans word for splinter is also “speld”.  OED on speld:

Etymology:  Old English speld neuter, = Old Norse speld , spjald (Norwegian spjeld , Swedish spjell ), related to Gothic spilda (feminine), Middle High German and German dialect spelte tablet, splinter, chip, etc.: see spald v. ...

2. A chip or splinter.
a1375 William of Palerne (1867) l. 3855 So spakli here speres al on speldes went.
a1375 William of Palerne (1867) l. 3603 Þe kniȝt spere in speldes alto-schiuered.

OED on spale:

Etymology:  Of uncertain origin: compare spall n.1 and speel n.1
There is resemblance in form to Old Norse spal-, spǫlr bar, rod, short piece, Middle High German (and German dialect) spale rung of a ladder, German dialect spale, spal wooden spit, wedge; but real connection with these is doubtful.

Sc. and north.
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a. A splinter or chip, a thin piece or strip, of wood.
a1500 Ratis Raving 57 With stikis, and with spalys small,

Both words refer to the verb spald, to splinter, from about 1400.  Here’s the etymology from OED:

Forms:  α. ME, 18 spald, 18 spauld. β. ME spawde, 18 spaud, spaad, spoad.

Etymology:  < Middle Low German spalden, = obsolete West Frisian spâlde, Middle Dutch spouden (Dutch spouwen; West Frisian spoude, spouwe), Old High German spaltan (Middle High German and German spalten), to split. A different grade of the stem is represented by Gothic spilda, Old Norse speld, spjald, tablet, Old English speld, Middle High German and German dialect spelte splinter.
English dialects have also the n. spald , spaud , corresponding to Middle Low German spalde and spald (German spalte , spalt ), and the derivative verb spalder , spauder (compare spalderling n.), = Middle Low German spalderen.
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north. and Sc.

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a.trans. To splinter, split, break up, lay open or flat.

SteveG, if you’re around - do you also recognize speld?

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Posted: 05 June 2013 02:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Often misspeld

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Posted: 05 June 2013 02:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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happydog - 03 June 2013 06:42 PM

Dr. Kate Pulaski: Dah-ta, look at this.
Lt. Commander Data: [looking slightly confused] ‘Day-ta’.
Dr. Kate Pulaski: What?
Lt. Commander Data: My name. It is pronounced ‘Day-ta’.
Dr. Kate Pulaski: Oh?
Lt. Commander Data: You called me “Dah-ta”.
Dr. Kate Pulaski: [laughing] What’s the difference?
Lt. Commander Data: One is my name. The other is not.

Was that /’dɑːtə/ vs. /’deɪtə/?  I would expect the mispronunciation to be /’dætə/.  Or is that a cis-/transpondian thing?

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Posted: 05 June 2013 05:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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I think nobody so far has mentioned “spill”, an ordinary, non-dialect word for a thin strip of wood

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Posted: 05 June 2013 06:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Was that /’dɑːtə/ vs. /’deɪtə/?  I would expect the mispronunciation to be /’dætə/.  Or is that a cis-/transpondian thing? ’deɪtə/?  I would expect the mispronunciation to be /’dætə/.  Or is that a cis-/transpondian thing?

/’dɑːtə/ is a moderately common pronunciation in the UK and Australia.

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Posted: 05 June 2013 08:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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And the verb spall, meaning ‘to shed flakes’ is standard in e.g. the building trade. The bloke who comes round to quote for your restoration works sucks his teeth, shakes his head and says ‘We’ll have to cut out and replace that whole doorcase, love, the stone’s spalling. It’ll cost you!’.

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Posted: 05 June 2013 08:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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I think nobody so far has mentioned “spill”, an ordinary, non-dialect word for a thin strip of wood

Huh!  I had never heard of this, and was tempted to say, “Are you sure it’s non-dialect?”, but there it is in MW and OED without any usage notes.  My lesson in humility for the day.

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Posted: 05 June 2013 09:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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And the verb spall, meaning ‘to shed flakes’ is standard in e.g. the building trade.

The nouns spall and spalling are also used in the military. Modern anti-tank rounds often do not actually penetrate armor nowadays, but rather cause the interior walls of the tank or armored vehicle to spall, killing the occupants.

(Spreading the joy on this lovely day.)

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Posted: 05 June 2013 09:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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I think nobody so far has mentioned “spill”, an ordinary, non-dialect word for a thin strip of wood

Huh!  I had never heard of this, and was tempted to say, “Are you sure it’s non-dialect?”, but there it is in MW and OED without any usage notes.  My lesson in humility for the day.

I had heard of it, but only in the context of using such a strip to light a fire or one’s pipe, and always assumed vaguely that this function was part of its meaning.

But now I know better it’s obvious that spillikins are just ‘small spills’!

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Posted: 05 June 2013 12:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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I hope nobody minds if I interject something completely non-linguistic.  It won’t take long at all, I promise.

In Canada, cream soda is made with fruit?!

OK, carry on.

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Posted: 07 June 2013 12:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Canadians have a somewhat superstitious aversion to microwaving water to boil it. Nearly all Canadians have electric kettles for boiling water, and will heat up soup on the stove instead of the microwave.

Um ... does this really seem like a bizarre thing to people in the USA? Using a microwave to boil water is like driving a Humvee to the bathroom.

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Posted: 07 June 2013 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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My wife and I are Americans, and we always boil water on the stove (though we have a microwave).

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Posted: 07 June 2013 05:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Is it just me, or do others find it nearly impossible to boil water in a microwave. I’ve found that microwaves, even high-powered ones like I’ve got, have a tough time heating water. I have trouble getting it hot, never mind boiling.  I just use a kettle on the stove. And we do have electric kettles in the States, although I’ve never used one because lack of kitchen space makes a separate appliance for boiling water unwieldy.

(I don’t have problems with heating other liquids in the microwave. It’s just water that’s the issue.)

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Posted: 07 June 2013 05:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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I live in a studio apt with no proper kitchen and no stove, so I boil water in the microwave all the time. It definitely takes longer than normal food cooking, but I’ve also experienced the problem of the water becoming superheated without boiling and when I go to take it out, the disturbance causes it to flash into a boil.

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