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the ultimate Christian name
Posted: 30 June 2013 01:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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That is really weird to me: in both Spain and Mexico Christianity is the main religion. According to the Christian faith, Jesus was the son of God, and he himself was a God. (right?) Both Jesús the name and Jesús the God are spelled and pronounced in the same way in Spanish. I get it, it’s a different culture, etc., but still… in a country where some 70 or 80 percent of the population believes in a God they name their children after this God (is he? Or he’s just a son?). I wonder if they feel strange saying phrases like “Jesus, you little brat, come here already, dinner’s getting cold!”. And to top it off when you sneeze in Spain, you’re more than likely to hear back “Jesús”. You know, like a “bless you”. So imagine: someone sneezes, another guy says “Jesús”, and a third guy turns his back and says “Que?”

I’ve just felt an urge to go to Spain just to witness that.

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Posted: 30 June 2013 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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That is really weird to me:

Not to me; nor, apparently, to hundreds of millions of Spanish speakers. Loosen up, slepinio! If people want to name their children after their God, who are we to say them nay? It does not necessarily bespeak a lack of respect - if anything, the opposite, I’d say. There are plenty of precedents, in many cultures (some of them very ancient), of people invoking the names of their gods when naming their children. But we’re in danger of straying from etymology......

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Posted: 01 July 2013 10:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Yeah… I would probably think differently if I were a Spanish speaker. I’m just curious why it is how it is in the Spanish-speaking world, and not anywhere else. I somehow find the answer

Piety takes different forms among different nations.

not satisfactory. But you’re right, it’s becoming a topic for a different forum.

Edit: Oh, and please note the difference between thinking something is odd, and thinking that it’s wrong. So don’t “loosen up” me, cause I ain’t tight :)

[ Edited: 01 July 2013 10:11 AM by slepinio ]
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Posted: 01 July 2013 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I wonder if they feel strange saying phrases like “Jesus, you little brat, come here already, dinner’s getting cold!”

No, they don’t feel strange because they, and everyone else, understands who they’re talking to. There’s no confusion, or weirdness, over the fact that people have the same name as the deity because it’s a normal part of everyday life.

[ Edited: 01 July 2013 10:51 AM by happydog ]
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Posted: 01 July 2013 06:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Interestingly (or perhaps not), the most common Arabic form of Jesus is Isa, but Arabic Christians use the name [i[Yasu. However, Isa is a moderately common given name among Arab Muslims AND Christians, but Yasu is not.

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