Four changes to English so subtle we hardly notice they’re happening
Posted: 30 June 2013 12:31 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Just in case this doesn’t come up on people’s radar, an interesting bringing-together of slow changes in the English language here: I believe I use all of the “modern” forms except the “get-passive”, which I probably resist taking on board because of the insistence 50+ years ago of all my primary school teachers that we not use the word “get” in our writing ...

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Posted: 30 June 2013 02:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Regarding number 2: The so-called simple present and the progressive serve somewhat different functions.  If, for example, I were to say, “I live with my parents” that would be the normal state.  Perhaps I have just gotten out of school and I haven’t struck out on my own yet.  But if I say “I’m living with my parents” I’m more likely describing a temporary situation.  Perhaps my house has just burned down and I’m living in my parents’ house until I get the insurance straightened out and a new place to live.

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Posted: 30 June 2013 07:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Regarding number 2: The so-called simple present and the progressive serve somewhat different functions.

You are describing a traditional distinction that, according to the article, is in the process of being eroded.

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Posted: 30 June 2013 11:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I try not to use “get”, either, but it slips in now and again.  The sense of “get” meaning become is first attested in 1600 - “The Merchant of Venice “ by Shakespeare.  I wonder if the sense of “get” in “get real”, US slang 1969, derives from this sense.

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