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Posted: 25 August 2007 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I too was baffled by the joke, which I read as indicating that “Honolulu” was to be said, for no readily apparent reason, after the, er, job was finished, so to speak.  If, as you suggest, saying “Honolulu” was supposed to produce the appropriate mouth movements, I see why “Casablanca” would not serve, but I don’t think that point was made clearly.  Sorry, Dutchtoo, but there it is.

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Posted: 25 August 2007 08:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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The couple have no idea and the counselor explains the technique “And then you say Honolulu”

I would have thought that Lionello of all folks here would have followed this line of the joke.

It may be that I’m accustomed to Germanic syntax (and Dutchtoo is just so good at English syntax that it is hard to pick this up) or it may be that I have an unregenerate “dirty mind.” The way I read/heard this story was, that the counselor “explains the technique” (do I have to go into detail here?) and then [while in the midst of the technique in question] the woman is to say the word “Honolulu.”

She says, instead, “Casablanca.” (which is a wonderful parallel with Lionello’s joke about “blow” being a figure of speech, which, by-the-by was in the unedited version of Dr. T’s first note).

If I’m wrong about all this, then we have an entirely different joke and I will have claimed authorship.  [please note for the record].

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Posted: 25 August 2007 09:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Lionello’s joke about “blow” being a figure of speech, which, by-the-by was in the unedited version of Dr. T’s first note).

I don’t think so.

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Posted: 25 August 2007 11:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I too took it that ‘Honolulu’ was a totally arbitrary word, signifying completion of the task at hand, and the joke was the couple’s misinterpretation of this.

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Posted: 26 August 2007 04:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Dr. Techie - 25 August 2007 09:15 PM

Lionello’s joke about “blow” being a figure of speech, which, by-the-by was in the unedited version of Dr. T’s first note).

I don’t think so.

Wow!  I totally imagined that!  Evidently I thought of that old joke while reading Dr. T’s note and ascribed it to him.  Sheesh!

And Aldi:  It could be that the whole joke is just absurd and I have too much of a literal mind.

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Posted: 26 August 2007 07:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I did toy with the idea that the motions of the tongue in pronouncing ‘Honolulu’ had something to do with the joke, and it’s certainly possible. It depends, of course, on when the word is supposed to be spoken, ie during the act or after it. My reading of it leans to the latter.

(I’m tempted to ask my spouse if .......................  No, better not!)

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Posted: 26 August 2007 08:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Following the always admirable example of aldiboronti, i have been putting a powerful (even if slightly mouldy) brain to work on this intriguing problem. Conclusion: a lot would depend on the age of the fellatOR (not the fellatEE), and on the condition of his/her teeth. Were the exercise to be performed by an elderly person, after removal of all dentures, the situation (not the position) could change entirely from those hitherto envisaged. It wouldn’t make much difference whether “Casablanca” or “Honolulu” were mentioned (mumbled, i fancy) --- both being four-syllable words. A more interesting effect might be achieved with “Antananarivo”, or “Belo Horizonte do Sul”; and quite spectacular effects could be hoped for with the full name of that Welsh village, Llanfairpwll-whatsit-gogoGOTH. Mind you, the performer (dare i say “the musician”?) might --- under the circumstances --- have a job getting his/her mouth around that last name. Unless, of course, he/she had A Way With Words.........

;-)

(edited for typo)

[ Edited: 26 August 2007 08:43 AM by lionello ]
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Posted: 26 August 2007 09:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Lionello, you’re a tonic! I shall always look upon Welsh girls in future with a speculative twinkle in my eye. :)

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Posted: 26 August 2007 09:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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“It could be that the whole joke is just absurd and I have too much of a literal mind”.

Just another shagging dog of a story

PS “Lionello, you’re a tonic!”

And I’ll bet he’s even more of a tonic on the sofa, singing, “do,re,me,fel,la,t,OHHH"!

PPS And talking about Casablanca, isn’t the highfellutin name for a mouth-organ, the harMonica?

[ Edited: 26 August 2007 08:07 PM by Skibberoo ]
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Posted: 26 August 2007 10:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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I know a very funny joke in French involving a wide-mouthed frog, a photographer, and the words “confiture” and “marmelade”.  It’s not the least bit funny in American mainly because the change in the shape of your mouth is much less extreme (tyuur vs. cher), but also very few Americans know what confiture is.

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Posted: 26 August 2007 11:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Wow, what a silly joke can accomplish. My computer is down, so I couldn’t get back sooner, but thank you Oecolampedus for enlightening those that were in the dark. Maybe that the Dutch pronunciation of the words make it work better in that language*. ‘Casablanca’ does have a more ‘stacato’ feature in Dutch making it, say, not really fit for the job. We could devise some sort of test, of c… No, let’s not go there.

Well, you’re right of course Myridion. People who think it’s a noun, treat it as a noun and aren’t avoiding anything. I was rather thinking of more language conscious people actually. A rare breed, but they are still out there.

*doesn’t all this add a new dimension to the etymology of ‘language’?

[ Edited: 26 August 2007 11:22 PM by Dutchtoo ]
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Posted: 27 August 2007 11:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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well done, Skibberoo --- a witty pun (unlike most puns)

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Posted: 27 August 2007 01:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Well, I think Durtchtoo’s joke is completely unrealistic - what polite Dutch lady would speak with her mouth full?

There is, in fact, a joke in Britain with a similar conceit, featuring the characters Bill and Ben from the BBC children’s programme The Flowerpot Men, who speak in a nonsense language known as “Flobalob”, since it consists mostly of just those syllables:

Bill says to Ben: “Flobalobalob.” And Ben says to Bill: “If you loved me, you’d swallow that ...”

Interestingly (well, I think so) this is one of those rare jokes with an alternative, clean and almost as funny punchline. In the clean version:

Bill says to Ben: “Flobalobalob.” And Ben says to Bill: “Come on, mate, you’re pissed - I’m taking you home ...”

(Pissed, of course, in the Rightpondian sense of drunk, rather than the Leftpondian sense of angry ...)

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Posted: 27 August 2007 07:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Dutchtoo - 26 August 2007 11:09 PM

*doesn’t all this add a new dimension to the etymology of ‘language’?

It does indeed.  We once had a member of the old board who went by the--not altogether original--screen name of “cunning linguist.”

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Posted: 05 January 2010 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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The joke is re-posted here for reference:

A man and woman visit a marriage counselor. He advises them to be more creative when it comes to sex. “You might want to try felatio” he says. The couple have no idea and the counsellor explains the technique “And then you say Honolulu” he summarizes. One month later they have their next session and the man appears to be quite unhappy. The counsellor is surprised and asks them to recapitulate what they have been practising. “And then you said Honolulu?”, he asks.  “Damn” the woman says, “I was so sure it was Casablanca”.

The joke is explained thus: the couple went to see a marriage counselor. He advises them to spice up their sex life. We can infer from this that something in their relationship was lacking. While the counselor’s suggestion to try fellatio SHOULD have made the couple happier (in the bedroom, we assume), as per his suggestion, it did not. However, the cause for their unhappiness is not related to the actual act of fellatio, or is at the very least less of a concern to the couple than the argument over who was right about what word the counselor suggested. Get it?

aldiboronti was closest. As for the rest of you… WOW.

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