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Posted: 05 January 2010 03:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Sorry Sid, but WOW back.  Here, I’ll give you a similar joke (which works even better in French, but...).

A wide-mouth frog goes to have his picture taken by the photographer. 
The photographer says, “On three, say “cheese”.  1… 2… 3”.  The wide-mouth frog says “Cheese!”.
“Oh, no!” says the photographer, “That won’t do at all! The sides of your mouth go outside the frame.  What will we do?  Wait, I have an idea! On three, say “Confiture"."
“Okay.”
“1… 2… 3”
“Marmalade.”

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Posted: 05 January 2010 04:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Is the “WOW back” a good thing or a bad thing?

See, now that joke is funny, but the premise of the punchline is entirely due to the definitions of “confiture”, is it not?

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Posted: 05 January 2010 10:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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That depends. Did you mean “WOW” as a good thing or a bad thing? ;-)

No, not just the definition. Confiture and marmalade are types of preserves, but saying confiture leaves you with pursed lips while marmalade has the opposite effect thus ruining the second shot much as Honolulu has you purse your lips while moving your tongue up and down vs. Casablanca’s biting down and “spitting” out.

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Posted: 06 January 2010 06:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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the premise of the punchline is entirely due to the definitions of “confiture”, is it not?

No, not even a little bit.  You seem to have missed the point of both jokes, in the process insulting everyone else here.  Congratulations!

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Posted: 07 January 2010 08:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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For some reason this discussion is reminding me of the great Anglo-Irish diplomat Sir Con O’Neill.

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Posted: 29 October 2011 07:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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... meanwhile, time passed ... and back on topic: I once heard that the term ‘blow job’ is is a simplification of a ‘head below job’ - an expression used by sailors to describe the services offered by some, er, working girls. Also might explain why the Americans use the slang ‘head’ perhaps?

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Posted: 30 October 2011 04:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Google Books has nary a single citation from the nineteenth century of below job in anything close to this sense. (I searched 1800-1910 to give some padding around “Victorian.") Most of the hits are collocations of below with the Biblical name Job. Of course, this is not necessarily conclusive as the subject and slang term wouldn’t be the type of thing to see publication.

But not a single slang dictionary I know of records below job as a term of art. Even Farmer & Henley, which is extraordinarily comprehensive when it comes to sexual slang, has never heard the term.

The addition of head to the story is a nice touch, although that term is pretty transparent. I wouldn’t have thought head needed a convoluted explanation.

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Posted: 30 October 2011 04:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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On reviewing this thread, as it rears its ugly head for the third time, I am struck by the thought that “blow job” (whatever its etymology) is far too mundane a title, for an activity which words in general are scarcely adequate to describe. Might I suggest, instead, “Trumpet Voluntary”? I think the latter expression conveys, much more felicitously, the joyous sense of .... may I say apotheosis?.... and of ineffable harmony, attendant upon a successful performance of Fellatio (doesn’t that sentence make it sound like an opera by Beethoven?).  To make the suggestion even more à propos, let me remind this forum of at least one famous trumpet voluntary (that by J. Clark) which is often performed upon the organ.......

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Posted: 30 October 2011 11:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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’Below job’ seems so obviously—well, to me—the kind of ‘bloody=by our Lady’ etymology that I’m surprised anyone thought it could be true.

As for why ‘blow’ should be used rather than the opposite and more apposite ‘suck’—no idea, really, but it’s common enough. Cf. German blasen, French souffler and probably a host of equivalents I don’t happen to know.

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Posted: 31 October 2011 02:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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I have been told, but can’t attest to this, that the name of the practice in Japanese literally means “playing the bamboo flute”.

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Posted: 31 October 2011 06:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Yes, the word 尺八 (shakuhachi, literally 1.8 shaku, roughly 60 cm) means both ‘bamboo flute’ and ‘blowjob’ in Japanese.

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Posted: 31 October 2011 06:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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shakuhachi, literally 1.8 shaku, roughly 60 cm

I can’t help feeling that someone over there in Japan is flattering himself (or needs a new measuring tape)

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Posted: 31 October 2011 07:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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shakuhachi, literally 1.8 shaku, roughly 60 cm
---

Wait ... hachi means 1.8?

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Posted: 31 October 2011 07:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Is “going down” really archaic?

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Posted: 31 October 2011 08:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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Is “going down” really archaic?

No it’s not, and Oecolampadius provided a vignette to indicate it’s still in vogue.

And I don’t know why Hitchens would have called it “now archaic” as if it had become archaic recently.  I don’t even consider it old-fashioned, which would certainly precede archaic.

P.S.  The thing the Japanese call a “bamboo flute” is called a “skin flute” in certain circles in the U.S.  I don’t know whether we got it fom them, or they got it from us, or maybe it’s just a natural name for the thing.

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