The die is cast
Posted: 18 August 2013 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Did this figurative expression originally relate to a die meaning a gaming cube, or a die meaning a form used in forging metal etc.?

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Posted: 18 August 2013 04:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The gaming cube, singular of “dice”.  “Cast” here means thrown, not formed from liquid hardening in a mold.
It’s a translation of iacta alea est, a phrase attributed to Julius Caesar upon the crossing of the Rubicon.

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Posted: 19 August 2013 04:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Interesting. Thanks.

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Posted: 19 August 2013 04:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It’s a translation of iacta alea est, a phrase attributed to Julius Caesar upon the crossing of the Rubicon.

Although that’s a Latin translation of what he supposedly said, which was in Greek. See this old thread.

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Posted: 19 August 2013 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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From Wikipedia:

Lewis and Short, citing Casaubon and Ruhnk, suggest that the text of Suetonius should read Jacta alea esto, which they translate as “Let the die be cast!”, or “Let the game be ventured!”. This matches Plutarch’s third-person aorist imperative ἀνερρίφθω κύβος (anerrhiphtho kybos).

(When I see “this old thread” I think of, say, 2004, not last May.)

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