BL: crash blossom
Posted: 27 August 2013 05:25 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Blooming crash blossoms

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Posted: 27 August 2013 07:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I think that in another thread, I mentioned one of my favourite examples: “Financing challenges dog miners as industry churns through cycle”

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Posted: 27 August 2013 08:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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My favorite is “British Left Waffles on Falkland Islands,” but alas I have seen no evidence that this headline was actually printed in a newspaper.  Why people think they need to make such things up when there are so many true examples is a mystery, but that’s the world we live in.

If you have access to ProQuest (my college unfortunately seems to have cancelled its subscription), you might be able to verify or refute this.  As mentioned in this thread, a variety of sources, including at least one apparently scholarly book, give a specific date and newspaper (April 28, 1982, The Guardian) for the headline, which to my mind increases the likelihood it is real.  At the time of that thread, the digitization of back issues had not reached 1982, but based on the description of the archives at the Guardian site, it should have by now. (However, they apparently no longer offer archival access at their own site, only through ProQuest.)

[ Edited: 27 August 2013 08:23 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 27 August 2013 08:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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@OPT: nice!  So unfair, those poor mining dogs being expected to unravel the mysteries of financing.

Of the three headlines in the BL, the only one that confused me was the first ("Girl found alive in France murders car.").  That one gets bonus points, as it features both a crash blossom and what Language Log calls a “noun pile” (three nouns is a rather small pile, by BBC standards, but it is still unusual by Leftpondian standards.).  What threw me off was not the crash blossom itself: I knew right away that “murders” was a noun and that “France murders” was a unit, but I was baffled as to what a “France murders car” was.  I eventually worked out that the girl was found alive in a car that was somehow associated with the “France murders”, but still wasn’t sure how the car qualified as a “France murders car.”.  The whole thing made me curious enough to google the headline and read the story, showing, I guess, that this particular headline did a masterful job of accomplishing one of its key objectives: teasing the story.

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Posted: 27 August 2013 10:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Has anybody ever verified (or disproved) the legendary British WWII headline (or possibly newsstand poster) ‘Eighth Army Push Bottles Up Germans’?

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Posted: 27 August 2013 02:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’ve got access to The Guardian from 1981 onward. It doesn’t appear to be there.

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Posted: 11 January 2015 12:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Today’s newspaper carries an appreciation of Miller Williams, a poet from Arkansas who died on Jan. 1.  Included in the article was one of Williams’ poems, which I thought worth sharing, and appropriate to add to this old thread.  I reproduce it in its entirety:

My Wife Reads the Paper at Breakfast on the Birthday of the Scottish Poet

Poet Burns to Be Honored, the headline read.
She put it down. “They found you out,” she said.

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Posted: 11 January 2015 03:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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"Nightmare ending as mother films kids in car”

I misread this at first. They mean there was a nightmare conclusion, and I thought they meant a still-ongoing nightmare was now ending.

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Posted: 12 January 2015 12:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Dr. Techie - 11 January 2015 12:28 PM


My Wife Reads the Paper at Breakfast on the Birthday of the Scottish Poet

Poet Burns to Be Honored, the headline read.
She put it down. “They found you out,” she said.

This is the best laugh I’ve had in a few days.

As someone whose inextricable partner is both a foreign speaker (Portuguese) and a professional translator (books), I’ve had my moments of trying to explain English-language headlines. It ain’t easy.

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Posted: 12 January 2015 12:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Isn’t crash blossom considered a neologism for a misplaced modifier?

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Posted: 12 January 2015 06:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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It’s a sub-category of the misplaced modifier, common to newspaper headlines.

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Posted: 12 January 2015 06:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Today’s newspaper carries an appreciation of Miller Williams, a poet from Arkansas who died on Jan. 1.  Included in the article was one of Williams’ poems, which I thought worth sharing, and appropriate to add to this old thread.  I reproduce it in its entirety

Thanks for that; my brother studied with Williams at U of Arkansas, and we always felt he didn’t get enough acclaim.

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Posted: 12 January 2015 09:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Dave Wilton - 12 January 2015 06:08 AM

It’s a sub-category of the misplaced modifier, common to newspaper headlines.

Thank you.

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Posted: 12 January 2015 01:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Thanks for that; my brother studied with Williams at U of Arkansas, and we always felt he didn’t get enough acclaim.

I have to admit that I did not know of him before reading of his death, but based on the excerpts from his work included in the newspaper article, I intend to look for more of it.  Interestingly, he was also a biologist.

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