BL: deer
Posted: 30 August 2013 03:17 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Yes, in Anglo-Saxon England even Bambi was fearsome.

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Posted: 30 August 2013 09:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I think the word “micla” has survived in Lowland Scots (mickle, muckle) with the same meaning.

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Posted: 31 August 2013 12:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Shakespeare in King Lear has Edgar eating ‘mice and rats and such small deer’. Of course, that might already have been a rustic Warwickshire dialect usage.

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Posted: 01 September 2013 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Verba seem to be just as mutant as tempora. I never thought of mice as deer, until now. Would have seemed incongruous, somehow. Mind you, it’s not easy to think of them as beasts, either. 

My heart’s in the Highlands, I’ll say it but twice,
My heart’s in the Highlands, a-chasing the mice.
And when it returns, I shall not take my ease,
But go after those beasts that have nibbled my cheese.

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Posted: 03 September 2013 02:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Minor nitpick: the second sentence seems to be missing a word: “In most of the common examples one of [the] readings is humorous.” (Or, you could insert a comma after “examples”, delete the “of”, and change “readings” to “reading”.)

As a side note, ISTM that in many popular crash blossoms, the “wrong” reading is the more natural one based on the syntax (at least, the syntax used in non-headlinese English), while the “right” reading makes more sense based on the context of the story (and/or common sense) but is more difficult to tease out of the actual words used in the headline.  If you don’t know anything about the background of the story, you are sometimes left to pick between a reading that doesn’t make any sense from a common sense standpoint (how would a found-alive girl murder a car?) and one where you can’t untangle the network of connections (in what sense was the car in which the girl was found alive a “France murders car”?).  And, sometimes, the challenge is coming up with any plausible interpretation of the headline: the obvious reading from a syntactical standpoint is obviously wrong from a common sense standpoint, but no OTHER reading of the headline springs to mind, leaving one to grasp at straws (or read the article, but where’s the fun in that?)

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Posted: 03 September 2013 03:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Correct, even though it took me a moment to figure out the comment isn’t about the deer entry.

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Posted: 03 September 2013 05:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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D’oh, sorry about that.

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