BL: luxury
Posted: 06 October 2013 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]
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What goes around comes around

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Posted: 06 October 2013 09:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Luxury is always a vicious quality in Jacobean drama and usually connotes lust. In The Revenger’s Tragedy (long thought to be by Tourneur, now usually assigned to Thomas Middleton) one of the villains is Lussorioso, whose chief quality is certainly lechery, as the qualities of his brothers Ambitioso and Supervacuo are ruthless ambition and, well, supervacuousness

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Posted: 06 October 2013 10:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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In modern Spanish, the word lujuria specifically denotes lust and sexual excess. The Spanish word expressing “luxury” in the modern English sense is lujo. I think this parallels to a certain extent what Dave writes about ancient Roman usage.

Glad to see you, aldi. wordorigins.org hath need of thee, tho’ never a fen of stagnant waters --- with thee, she sparkleth more brightly. Keep bubbling!*

*No, that is not a typo for “burbling”. Others of us do that.....

;-)

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Posted: 06 October 2013 11:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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And it’s good to be back, lionello, I’ve missed you all too.

I suddenly thought of the word lush for drunkard and wondered if that had any connection with luxury. Nothing in OED to indicate that however. I did learn however that the noun lush originally signified drink as well as drunkard. As for etymology OED simply says ‘of obscure origin, perhaps suggested by lush, adj. 2, on which term there is even less info:

slang.

(See quot. 1819.)
1819 J. H. Vaux New Vocab. Flash Lang. in Mem., Lush, or Lushy, drunk.

Even the more familiar lush, adj.1 meaning luxuriant in growth, etc has no etymological connection with luxury. OED tentatively suggests that it is an “[o]nomatopoeic alteration of lash adj. 3.”, with which obscure term I leave you before I get even more befuddled.

lash, adj.

Obs. exc. dial.

†1. Culpably negligent or remiss. Obs.

c1374 Chaucer tr. Boethius De Consol. Philos. iv. pr. iii. 122 Yif he be slowe and astoned and lache he lyueþ as an ass

†2. In physical sense: Loose, lax, relaxed. Obs.

1513 G. Douglas tr. Virgil Æneid ix. xiii. 81 Hys wery breist and lymmys lasch.

3.

a. Of food, fruits, grass, etc.: Soft, watery.

c1440 Promp. Parv. 288/1 Lasche, or to fresche, and vnsavery.

b. Of weather: Raw, wet.

1787 W. Marshall Provincialisms in Rural Econ. Norfolk II. 383 Lash, or Lashy, very wet; as ‘cold lashy weather’

c. Of a hide: Tender.

1798 Ann. Agric. 30 314 A thick hide is bad, and a very thin one too lash

d.  lash egg n. see quot. a1825. Obs. exc. dial.

a1825 R. Forby Vocab. E. Anglia (1830) , Lash-egg, an egg without a full formed shell; covered only with a tough film.

Having staggered up that blind alley I feel quite at home again!

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Posted: 06 October 2013 05:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Dr. Thomas Lushington (1590-1661) was an English chaplain and Rector of Burnham-Westgate and it has been well documented that he was quite fond of drinking.  Oddly enough, his descendants allegedly became brewers of fine ales.

It seems that the word lush, when used to denote someone who regularly takes alcoholic drinks, comes from the name of the dear fellow above. I found this chap’s name in the MacQuarie Dictionary, taken from ‘Idioms of the seventeenth century.’

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Posted: 06 October 2013 07:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Not likely.

The word lush isn’t recorded until 1790. It doesn’t seem likely that a relatively obscure clergyman would give rise to slang term 130 years after his death. (Although it does seem that he was quite the drinker in his youth.)

Lushington was a slang term in the early nineteenth century meaning a drunkard, but this is almost certainly a back formation on lush, not the original term. (Source: OED)

Also, if you cut and paste from another web site, as you’ve done here, you should quote it. We have a low tolerance for plagiarism around here.

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