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Are accents disappearing? 
Posted: 27 October 2013 08:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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lionello - 24 October 2013 05:17 AM

I [picture of heart] California

On a sidenote, I remember when these heart phrases started appearing (70s perhaps?) I always pronounced them as ‘I love whatever’, and I’m sure I wasn’t alone in so doing. Now of course it’s universally pronounced ‘I heart so-and-so’. But when did change? Or did it change? Was it always heart except among my quirky circle?

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Posted: 27 October 2013 01:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I too always thought it to be “love” and not “heart,” at least in my own head. But as far back as I can remember, when I actually heard people speak it, it has always been “heart.”

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Posted: 27 October 2013 01:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I’m sure I’ve seen the form “I l[heart]ve so-and-so”, with the red heart substituting just for “O”

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Posted: 27 October 2013 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I wonder how much I MY CAT bumper stickers may have contributed to reading the heart as “heart”.

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Posted: 27 October 2013 08:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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My favorite bumper sticker in that genre is “I [anatomically correct heart] Science”.

My first encounter with “I heart” was during the 1970’s “I Love New York” ad campaign, which was pronounced and sung verbatim on TV.  On the accompanying bumper stickers and t-shirts it was “I [heart] NY”.  Funny how I (and I assume most people) always pronounced the heart symbol as the word “heart”.

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Posted: 28 October 2013 06:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Funny how I (and I assume most people) always pronounced the heart symbol as the word “heart”.

I would say it’s inevitable, since the alternative, pronouncing it “love,” eliminates any connection to the visual symbol, which is what one wants to reference.

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Posted: 28 October 2013 07:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Be that as it may, my recollection is that the “heart” pronunciation was originally most widespread among people who disliked the fad.  I think the NPR commentator “Ian Sholes” was the first person I heard say “I heart my dog head.”

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Posted: 29 October 2013 12:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Dave Wilton - 23 October 2013 02:14 PM


Labov and his students went to three department stores in Manhattan, upscale Saks, mid-range Macy’s, and discount S. Klein. They asked questions of clerks that would require a response of “fourth floor.” If they clerk dropped any of the Rs, they then asked the clerk to repeat the answer, pretending they hadn’t heard. In the initial response, the employees at Sak’s had the highest number Rs pronounced, those at S. Klein the least, with Macy’s in the middle. But when repeating the answer, a greater number of employees from each store pronounced their Rs, code-switching into a standard accent. .

If, in a non-Australian setting, someone did not understand me first time, I’d probably de-Aussify when repeating myself (ie go closer to RP). F

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