Glean
Posted: 29 October 2013 08:25 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi there,
this is my first post and I am not a big forum person so I hope my etiquette is all right!

I am doing a project around the word ‘glean’ so I have been looking into its etymology.
I found the definitions I was expecting to find around collecting and gathering grain after the main harvest, gathering information etc.
But then I came across this in wiktionary:

Etymology 2
Noun
glean
(obsolete) cleaning; afterbirth
(Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary…

The only other reference to this definition I’ve been able to find on the internet is from wordnik.com:

n. The afterbirth, as of cow or other domestic animal; the cleaning. - From the Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

This particular definition is really interesting for the work I’m doing so I’d love to find as much information as I can on where this comes from. I would assume that the “Holland” referred to in the wiktionary entry is a writer who has used the word in this way. Any suggestions as to how I could go about finding this reference?
Any help or information would be greatly appreciated! Thx

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Posted: 29 October 2013 11:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The Holland referred to is the Elizabethan author and translator Philemon Holland and the OED has several cites from his translation of Pliny the Elder’s Naturalis Historia.

Here’s the relevant entry in OED:

glean, n.2

Etymology:  A variant of clean (? < clean v.), which has the same sense in some modern dialects; also called cleaning and cleansing.)

Obs.

The placenta or after-birth, esp. of a cow.

1601 P. Holland tr. Pliny Hist. World II. 327 The gleane of a Cow hauing newly calued..is good for any vlcers of the visage.
1601 P. Holland tr. Pliny Hist. World II. 341 The pellicle or glean wherein a kid was infolded within the dams wombe.
1742 W. Ellis Mod. Husbandman June xiii. 150 To..bring away her [sc. a cow’s] Glean.

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Posted: 30 October 2013 02:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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The two senses, of course, have entirely different etymologies. They’re not the same word; they just coincidentally happen to be spelled the same way.

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Posted: 30 October 2013 07:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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FWIW, in case this adds anything, the OED’s etymology for the “picking over a harvested field” sense is

< Old French glener, glainer (French glaner) to glean = Provençal glenar, grenar, late Latin (6th cent.) glenare, of unknown origin. The commonly assumed connection with medieval Latin gelima, Old English gielm, sheaf, is inadmissible; the forms with m are probably due to association with gleam.

In explanation of the last comment: in the 1500s the forms gleme, gleame, gleime were sometimes seen.

This entry has not been fully updated since 1900, so it may not be consistent with modern scholarship.

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Posted: 30 October 2013 11:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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A couple of years ago I came across a reference to a newspaper The Jamaica Gleaner which I thought was a great name and googling reveals there is a regional The Daily Gleaner in Canada. How common is this name for local papers? I’ve never heard of one in the UK. (The
Jamaican one is very old with a wide expat reach.)

Many newspapers retain old (but once cutting edge) names - Post, Mail, Express, Bugle (unless only in Spider-Man), Telegraph, Messenger, etc.  The Guardian, the Times of London. Steele was responsible for the The Tatler (with one t) and with Addison The Spectator. Who started this sort of naming? Was it the English? Le Monde, Suddeutsche Zeitung, Bild, Le Figaro, El Pais, the misnomer Pravda. Dissertation fodder.

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Posted: 30 October 2013 02:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Welcome, Dana. Your posting etiquette is commendable. You even checked other sources before inquiring; many posters of longer standing (present poster included) occasionally forget to do this.

You may not have been a forum person before; you are now. You started an interesting and (for me, at least) informative thread. Stick around.

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Posted: 31 October 2013 12:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Seconded. Welcome!

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Posted: 31 October 2013 02:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Many newspapers retain old (but once cutting edge) names - Post, Mail, Express, Bugle (unless only in Spider-Man), Telegraph, Messenger, etc. 

And an honourable mention for the Northampton Mercury, founded in 1720 and still going, which makes it one of the oldest newpapers in the world. Though even then the name ‘Mercury’ for a newspaper wasn’t original; it had been used for at least two journals in Restoration London.

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Posted: 01 November 2013 08:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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"Chronicle” is another newspaper name, more literal and less metaphorical than names like “Post”, “Bugle”, “Bee”, “Guardian”. Interestingly enough, the Biblical Chronicles are called in Hebrew Divrei Hayamim--- literally, “Matters [or “words"] of the Days”, i.e. more or less “Accounts of things that happened”.

About fifty years ago, there was published in Israel a series of periodicals called “Chronicles”, which told the history of ancient Israel from the time of Abraham, in a format exactly like a newspaper—banner, headlines, editorials, letters to the Ed., advertisements - the lot. It was an educational project. A new issue would appear every so often—I think it was once a month. I don’t remember how they dealt with the story of Jesus --- that would have called for some very tricky literary footwork. I think they just side-stepped --- that’s what I would have done—or maybe simply stopped, B.C. (Jewish history from the First Century onwards is mostly unmitigated disaster, anyway). --- The thing was absolutely brilliant --- a genuine journalistic tour de force. Some of the adverts were a real howl. I must look and see if my old copy’s still lying around somewhere. I don’t know of anyone else who’s done something comparable with any other part of world history.

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Posted: 01 November 2013 12:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Those “Chronicles” sound great but may have needed fact-checkers!
I’ve occasionally come across the Modesto Bee but why is it called the bee? A sting in the tail as it exposes malefactors? Reporters buzzing around collecting local news seems more likely.

[ Edited: 01 November 2013 12:42 PM by venomousbede ]
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Posted: 01 November 2013 01:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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The Modesto Bee adopted that name after it was taken over by the McLatchy newspaper company, which already owned the Sacramento Bee (the first by that name) and the Fresno Bee.  According to the Sacramento Bee website,

It’s been that since 1857 when James McClatchy founded the paper. An editorial on the first day of publication said: “The name of The Bee has been adopted as being different from that of any other paper in the state and as also being emblematic of the industry which is to prevail in its every department.”

So the idea is that they are hard-working busy bees.

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Posted: 01 November 2013 04:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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there is a regional The Daily Gleaner in Canada.

That one is in Huntington/Chateauguay area of Quebec province as I remember. It was the “Hometown” paper of my family when they lived there from 1847 to the early 1900s.

I take it back. The one I refer to is the “Huntingdon Gleaner.” The “Daily Gleaner” is in Fredericton NB

[ Edited: 01 November 2013 04:58 PM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 02 November 2013 01:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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So the idea is that they are hard-working busy bees.

Bang! there goes one more long-standing illusion. I always fancied that the name “Bee” for a newspaper implied that the paper was equipped with both honey and venom, to be dispensed as circumstances required.
I wish newspaper reporters were as accurate as they are busy, the b*****s.

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Posted: 02 November 2013 04:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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From the Sacramento Bee site that Doc refers to.

My favorite, though, is a weekly in Arkansas, in a town named De Queen. You’re ahead of me. It’s De Queen Bee. Really

And indeed here it is.

[ Edited: 02 November 2013 05:03 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 02 November 2013 10:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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From the De Queen Bee unearthed by Awesome Aldi:

Artists whose works are displayed during the annual and highly popular CACA Art Show in King would be invited to display their work at the center.

Somehow, I feel I’d prefer to give that show a miss. My nose is already twitching.........

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Posted: 02 November 2013 11:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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lionello - 02 November 2013 10:16 AM

From the De Queen Bee unearthed by Awesome Aldi:

Artists whose works are displayed during the annual and highly popular CACA Art Show in King would be invited to display their work at the center.

Somehow, I feel I’d prefer to give that show a miss. My nose is already twitching.........

What with the talk of cows and gleaning caca, it brings to mind that mousskaka has come to our American shores and has become a part of our tradition. Of course, something’s lost in translation but then again something’s gained.

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