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What, to you, is a jumper? 
Posted: 07 November 2013 01:49 AM   [ Ignore ]
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/06/rumer-willis-crop-top_n_4225094.html

She created the perfect punk rock mix in a cutaway polka dot jumper with a white cropped t-shirt and black biker boots.

You’ll need to take a look at the picture of the polka-dotted item.

In Australia, a jumper is a long-sleeved winter garment, usually made of wool (or a similar synthetic fibre).
This is a picture of what I think a jumper is.

http://www.thenandnowshop.com/men/light-grey-merino-wool-jumper/pd9992820.html

So what does the term mean in the USA, the UK, etc?

(Not being much of a fashionisto, I couldn’t tell you the Australian name for the item of clothing RW is wearing in that picture.)

EDIT: gave link instead of image

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Posted: 07 November 2013 03:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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My concept of jumper is colored by my Navy experience.  I think first of this.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 03:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Faldage - 07 November 2013 03:25 AM

My concept of jumper is colored by my Navy experience.  I think first of this.

Does that open at the front? My jumpers don’t do that.

Still, a bit more similar to my idea.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 03:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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This American who grew up with two sisters recognizes Rumer Willis’s garment as a jumper.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 04:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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A jumper, in the UK, is a synonym for jersey, sweater, pullover, etc. (It must go on over the head – the term doesn’t include any item of knitwear that opens down the front .) I was at an international museums conference in Bayreuth a couple of years ago and well remember a US archivist asking a London librarian if he was coming out for a stroll and a drink somewhere. He replied yes, but first he’d have to nip up to his room and put on a jumper. Her face was a study.

A British naval rating’s square-collared top garment is also called a jumper; but that’s a specialised usage which I don’t think many Rightpondians are likely to know unless they have some connection with the Navy.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 05:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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jtab4994 - 07 November 2013 03:57 AM

This American who grew up with two sisters recognizes Rumer Willis’s garment as a jumper.

Okay, so what would be the defining features of a jumper, up your way?

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Posted: 07 November 2013 06:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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A jumper, more fully jumper dress, is a pinafore dress, a collarless, sleeveless dress with a bib, worn over a blouse or jumper (Brit.), which is where I suspect it gets its name.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 06:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Well I’ll be.

Thanks

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Posted: 07 November 2013 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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This American who grew up with one sister also recognizes Rumer Willis’s garment as a jumper, and since my dad was in the Navy, I also recognize this as a jumper.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 07:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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From Quinion “”:

The origin has nothing to do with the verb to jump, but comes from the dialect jump or jup, meaning a man’s short coat or a woman’s under-bodice or tunic. This may derive in turn from the French juppe, a petticoat (now in modern French, jupe, “skirt”), which ultimately derived from the Arabic jubba, a loose outer garment.

He has also traced the US usage to:

... a Sears, Roebuck catalogue of 1916 that uses jumper frock to describe a pinafore dress worn over a blouse or shirt, which seems to be the original term, later shortened to jumper.

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Posted: 07 November 2013 10:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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FWIW, in my neck of the woods, jumper = one who jumps, and does not denote a clothing article.  I am familiar, of course, with the Rightpondian sense of the word, but it is not a term I use in everyday speech, and it would be a bit (but only a bit) surprising to me if I heard an American say “jumper” to denote a clothing article.  If an American did so, I would assume he or she simply meant “sweater”.  But I am far from hip to fashion trends or the associated lingo, and it does not surprise me (much) to learn that [jumper = clothing] for some Leftpondians, nor that it denotes some sort of specific type of sweater or similar item.  But I haven’t experienced such a usage first-hand.  (I had also never heard of the “Navy” sense of jumper until reading the comments in this post.)

It never would have occurred to me to call RW’s outfit “a jumper.” But my ignorance of that sense if the word may not be representative of Leftpondians generally.

[ Edited: 07 November 2013 10:46 AM by Svinyard118 ]
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Posted: 07 November 2013 02:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I just asked my wife (since I am completely ignorant in these matters) and she said to her it’s a skirt with a bib top (backless and sleeveless).  I think that’s what she said; the memory is already fading…

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Posted: 07 November 2013 04:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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OP Tipping - 07 November 2013 03:41 AM

Faldage - 07 November 2013 03:25 AM
My concept of jumper is colored by my Navy experience.  I think first of this.

Does that open at the front? My jumpers don’t do that.

Still, a bit more similar to my idea.

It doesn’t open at all.  You pull it over your head.  The picture I linked to is the dress blue jumper.  There were also undress blue jumpers and white jumpers.  There used to be a dress white jumper but it sailed quietly into the West.

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Posted: 08 November 2013 02:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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To me a jumper is a pullover, as opposed to a cardigan which opens at the front. I could have sworn we had a thread years ago on this but I can find neither hide nor hair of it.

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Posted: 08 November 2013 06:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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As this thread was started by one of our esteemed Antipodean correspondents, I feel it incumbent to share a venerable schoolboy riddle:

Q: What do you get if you cross a sheep with a kangaroo?

A: A woolly jumper.

This is of course only funny if you understand the Rightpondian/Underpondian sense of jumper…

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Posted: 08 November 2013 08:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Without other context, “jumper” to me carries the following meanings, in the order that they occur to me:
1) one who jumps, esp. a parachutist, or suicidal person on a ledge or bridge.
2) a piece of wire, particularly one used to make a temporary or optional connection, bypass a component, or connect two circuit boards.
3) an article of clothing whose specific definition eludes me, but which I tend to associate with toddlers (I think I had it confused with “romper").  I have sweaters that meet some of the definitions of “jumper” presented here, but I never refer to them as such. (N.b. I never served in the Navy or any other branch of the armed forces.)

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