2 of 2
2
What, to you, is a jumper? 
Posted: 08 November 2013 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2007-02-26
Dr Fortran - 08 November 2013 06:41 AM

/Underpondian

Antipondian (Australia being antipodean to the Pond.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 November 2013 08:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  64
Joined  2010-11-02

New English Dictionary on Historical Principles published in the UK in 1901 defined a jumper in year 1901 as “a kind of loose outer jacket reaching to the hips, made of canvas, serge, coarse linen, etc., and worn by sailors, truckmen, etc.”—http://archive.org/stream/newenglishdicpt205murruoft#page/629/mode/1up

That’s the same as the nautical jacket that the Americans with nautical (navy) connections were talking about above. The 1901 NED contains no trace of the meaning of a pullover. During the 1st half of the 20th century in Britain and Australia the word somehow got radically re-purposed to mean a pullover, and the earlier meaning got totally obliterated.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 November 2013 03:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4810
Joined  2007-01-03

Just so there is no confusion, the New English Dictionary is the OED.

The Century Dictionary, published 1889–91, defines jumper as:

A kind of loose jacket with sleeves worn by some classes of laborers, as seamen or stevedores, usually with overalls, reaching to the thighs, and buttoned the whole length in front; also, any upper garment of similar shape.

But it includes this description of a pullover (a hoodie) as a usage citation:

Men and women [Eskimo] are alike clothed with jacket and trousers. The jacket is a hooded jumper with openings only for face and hands. —A. W. Greely, Arctic Service, 32

And there is this second usage citation. I’m not sure what it’s describing:

A green-check cotton waist or blouse sewed into a belt—the masculine uniform of Fairharbor; he calls it a jumper. —E. S. Phelps, Old Maid’s Paradise

The Dictionary of American English (1942) defines it as:

One or other of a number of variously styled garments, esp. a jacket or blouse worn over a shirt, guimpe, etc.

The DAE includes a 1850s citation from Elisha Kane’s The United States Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin.: A personal narrative.

Kane’s Arctic explorations: The second Grinnell expedtion in search of Sir John Franklin includes this illustration.

Based on these early definitions and descriptions, I don’t think we can say that the word every referred to a very specific type of garment. There has always been some leeway in interpreting what falls within the category of “jumper.”

Image Attachments
jumper.png
Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 November 2013 04:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1195
Joined  2007-02-14

The Navy also had a uniform sweater that would have fit the definition given here for a jumper.  I don’t remember what it was called.  It couldn’t possibly have been sweater, I don’t suppose.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 November 2013 01:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  236
Joined  2008-07-19
OP Tipping - 08 November 2013 05:26 PM

Antipondian (Australia being antipodean to the Pond.)

I stand corrected.

*looks at floor, raises hat*

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 November 2013 02:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  845
Joined  2007-03-01

The Navy also had a uniform sweater that would have fit the definition given here for a jumper.  I don’t remember what it was called.  It couldn’t possibly have been sweater, I don’t suppose.

All the British services have one too, and refer to it colloquially as a woolly pully.

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 2
2