Etymology maps
Posted: 14 November 2013 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Pain in the ananas: etymology maps
Who would have thought that the marriage of two tiny little words - pine from the Latin ‘p─źnus’ meaning “sap, juice” and apple from ‘apple’ meaning “apple” would have split the UK from the rest of the world way back when it was first recorded in 1398?

Here via the Guardian.

More here as a reader pointed out.

[ Edited: 14 November 2013 12:27 PM by venomousbede ]
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Posted: 14 November 2013 11:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I posted this material in my recent thread, “Word origin maps”

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Posted: 15 November 2013 02:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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And is it even true? The OED is firm that pineapple in ME meant ‘pine cone’ and that the word was simply adopted in English to refer to the American bromeliad on account of the similarity of shape.

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Posted: 15 November 2013 07:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Sorry, OP. I missed your post which was a lot better. I’m a bit pressed for time having recently been told that my pad is to be demolished soon so I have to find new digs in the Big Mango smartish, hole in the head etc.

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