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Posted: 20 November 2013 04:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I wouldn’t say that the issue of stress is a “quibble.” It goes to the very heart of prosody. Not that there is anything inherently bad about imperfect rhymes, but sometimes the poet wants a perfect one.

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Posted: 20 November 2013 06:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Of course it’s not a quibble, and I assume anyone who makes such a claim is either too ignorant about what “rhyme” means to be discussing it or is arguing in bad faith.

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Posted: 20 November 2013 07:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Orange is pronounced with two syllables, stress on the first.

A lot of Americans manage with only one syllable, as indicated by the parentheses around the schwa in the OED’s pronunciation:
Brit. /ˈɒrᵻn(d)ʒ/ , U.S. /ˈɔr(ə)ndʒ/

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Posted: 20 November 2013 02:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Orange is pronounced with two syllables, stress on the first.

Again, not if you’re from Texas.  ;-)

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Posted: 22 November 2013 11:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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The points about prosody, metre and rhyme are well taken.

He has gone to fish for his Aunt Jobiska’s
Runcible cat with crimson whiskers.

Have you ever seen a cow with a green eyebrow?

If those aren’t proper rhymes I’m a Dutchman and orange could be rhymed with unhinge if you insist on the same number of syllables within the words though maybe not the same stress, I’m getting paranoid now. Or a lame rime riche of Haliborange and orange :(.

(Homage used to rhyme with porridge in the UK according to my 1980 Penguin dictionary (and was what I grew up saying and still do) but less so now. How about where you are? Not so sure about pottage as in mess of.)

[ Edited: 22 November 2013 11:52 AM by venomousbede ]
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Posted: 22 November 2013 01:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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In the strict sense, a rhyme requires that the last stressed vowel and all subsequent sounds are the same (and, to be pefect, that the sounds before the last stressed vowel differ).  Both unhinge and orange (in your dialect/accent) may end /ɪndʒ/, but they still don’t meet the strict criterion for a rhyme.

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Posted: 22 November 2013 10:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Need a rhyme for orange?
Try Sir G.F. Gorringe *

*Lieutenant General Sir George Frederick Gorringe KCB, KCMG, DSO (10 February 1868 – 24 October 1945)
(WikipediaHis nickname, Bloody Orange is rhyming slang. It was said to be appropriate for the commander of a division of London Territorials and also fitted his rude and unpleasant personality.)

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Posted: 23 November 2013 06:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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My little cousin Lynn
Had a little pin
Right in the middle of her doorhinge.

The hinges on her shed
Were painted all in red
But the ones on her house, they were orange.

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Posted: 23 November 2013 03:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Doesn’t work in Leftpondian English.

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