3 of 4
3
Words from forgotten fictional characters
Posted: 30 August 2007 11:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22
Myridon - 30 August 2007 11:13 AM

If Popeye is allowed, then the meaning of goon as a hired thug (not the older meaning of a stupid person).

I thought “goon” as in “hired thug” to be from Indian “goonda”, but perhaps it’s the other way around.

Is there genericization of wimpy “over there” where they have Wimpy Bars? (I’d gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today)

What meaning of “wimpy” were you thinking of?  “Wimpy” to me means either “like a wimp”, or the hamburger bar, or a large civil engineering contractor (if spoken, it’s spelt Wimpey).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 August 2007 07:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  311
Joined  2007-02-17
bayard - 30 August 2007 11:20 PM

Myridon - 30 August 2007 11:13 AM
Is there genericization of wimpy “over there” where they have Wimpy Bars? (I’d gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today)

What meaning of “wimpy” were you thinking of?  “Wimpy” to me means either “like a wimp”, or the hamburger bar, or a large civil engineering contractor (if spoken, it’s spelt Wimpey).

Let’s see, I said Wimpy Bar and gave Wimpy’s quote about hamburgers, so I must have been thinking of… (^_^)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 August 2007 07:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2853
Joined  2007-01-31

Regarding “goon”, the OED2 says “Perhaps a shortened form of dial. gooney (GONY 1) ‘a booby, a simpleton’; but more immediately from the name of a subhuman creature called Alice the Goon in a popular cartoon series by E. C. Segar (1894-1938), American cartoonist.”

Grant Barrett et al., over at Double-Tongued Dictionary, says “The Hindi and Urdu term goonda can be translated as rascal or ruffian and even as goon, but there is no evidence to indicate that the English goon comes from goonda or vice versa.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 September 2007 10:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

Myridon, I think the answer is no, then.  I’ve never heard “Wimpy” used like “Big Mac”. (BTW, a “Wimpy Bar” over here would be referred to as a “Wimpy” and I’m not familiar with the quote.  Perhaps wimpy (UK) don’t use it.  Mind you, I’ve spent very little of my life in Wimpys or any other hamburger emporium.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 September 2007 02:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  311
Joined  2007-02-17
bayard - 04 September 2007 10:31 AM

Myridon, I think the answer is no, then.  I’ve never heard “Wimpy” used like “Big Mac”. (BTW, a “Wimpy Bar” over here would be referred to as a “Wimpy” and I’m not familiar with the quote.  Perhaps wimpy (UK) don’t use it.  Mind you, I’ve spent very little of my life in Wimpys or any other hamburger emporium.

Let me start over then. 

I got the name Wimpy Bar off of the UK Wimpy site (there is no US Wimpy site since AFAIK there are no US Wimpy restaurants) where it does say that they have dropped Bar from the official name of the restaurant but I thought it would be clearer that I meant the restaurant if I included it.

“I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today” is what the fictional character Wimpy says in every (or nearly every) Popeye cartoon in which he appears.

I was wondering if where the word Wimpy with a capital W is associated with a specific fast-food restaurant and/or its hamburgers, is wimpy (with a little w) ever used to indicate other fast-food restaurants and/or food products thereof.  If it is, then it might fit the topic, otherwise it doesn’t.

(And when you say “I’ve never heard “Wimpy” used like “Big Mac”, are you saying that you call non-McDonald’s hamburgers “big macs” or that you don’t call the hamburgers at Wimpy a Wimpy burger or a Wimpy?)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 September 2007 11:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22
Myridon - 04 September 2007 02:05 PM

Let me start over then. 

I got the name Wimpy Bar off of the UK Wimpy site (there is no US Wimpy site since AFAIK there are no US Wimpy restaurants) where it does say that they have dropped Bar from the official name of the restaurant but I thought it would be clearer that I meant the restaurant if I included it.

“I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today” is what the fictional character Wimpy says in every (or nearly every) Popeye cartoon in which he appears.

Ah, I didn’t know about Wimpy being a UK company, nor about another Wimpy being a Popeye character.  Did you discover any connection between the two?

I was wondering if where the word Wimpy with a capital W is associated with a specific fast-food restaurant and/or its hamburgers, is wimpy (with a little w) ever used to indicate other fast-food restaurants and/or food products thereof.  If it is, then it might fit the topic, otherwise it doesn’t.

I think the answer is still no.  Perhaps some other UK-based contributor could support/challenge me on this.

(And when you say “I’ve never heard “Wimpy” used like “Big Mac”, are you saying that you call non-McDonald’s hamburgers “big macs” or that you don’t call the hamburgers at Wimpy a Wimpy burger or a Wimpy?)

The latter

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 September 2007 06:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2007-09-09

Quixotic?  Or it the work too well known?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 September 2007 07:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2853
Joined  2007-01-31

Far too well known, I would say.  Even if it were true that the novel is not much read anymore, there are many stage and film adaptations, including of course Man of La Mancha.  Don Quixote is not a forgotten character.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2007 06:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2344
Joined  2007-01-30

This one was on the tip of my tongue the other day but I couldn’t quite retrieve it. For some reason quixotic brought it back.

Rodomontade, defined in OED as ‘a vainglorious brag or boast’. It’s from Rodomonte, ‘the name of the boastful Saracen leader in Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso.’

After finally retrieving it it’s just struck me that Orlando Furioso’ is hardly a ‘forgotten work’. This is proving harder than I thought at first!

[ Edited: 12 September 2007 06:54 AM by aldiboronti ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2007 07:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2853
Joined  2007-01-31

After finally retrieving it it’s just struck me that Orlando Furioso’ is hardly a ‘forgotten work’.

Perhaps not in your classically-educated circles, aldi, but among the hoi polloi?  In the US at least, I doubt 1% of the population has heard of it (or at least, remembers any mention of it that they may have heard in college lit classes).

For myself, I doubt I’d know anything about it if it weren’t for having read L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt’s fantasy novel set in the world of Orlando.  Maybe I’m projecting my own ignorance on the general population, but I doubt it.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2007 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1286
Joined  2007-03-21

I, for one, nevahoiduvit.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2007 11:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4790
Joined  2007-01-03

I know nothing about it either. The name is vaguely familiar, but I’m probably confusing it with the Virginia Woolf novel.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2007 10:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2032
Joined  2007-02-19

Rodomontade, defined in OED as ‘a vainglorious brag or boast’. It’s from Rodomonte, ‘the name of the boastful Saracen leader in Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso.’

After finally retrieving it it’s just struck me that Orlando Furioso’ is hardly a ‘forgotten work’. This is proving harder than I thought at first!

thanks for that, aldi. Your posting sent me looking for references to Ariosto and “Orlando Furioso” (which i’ve never read, or even seen a copy of). Wikipedia has entertaining entries about both. Apparently, there are lots of people who have read the work: Spenser, Lope de Vega, Doré, J.L. Borges, Vivaldi, Handel, Haydn (or their librettists, at any rate), and of course that literary-minded bandit chieftain --- not exactly your average reading public, but then neither are you, aldi (or if you are, you’re the only person of my acquaintance ever to come up to average ;-).

I’ve seen “rodomontade” more than once spelt “rhodomontade”. I suppose this is a conflation with rhodo-, “pink, a rose”, which is very much more common: my easy-to-lift “Webster’s New World Collegiate” lists only one word beginning with “rodo-”, and half a dozen with “rhodo-”

[ Edited: 12 September 2007 10:24 PM by lionello ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 September 2007 10:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2344
Joined  2007-01-30

I fell in love with the urbane, witty and cynical Ariosto the first time I came across Orlando Furioso as a young man, in the magnificent translation of Sir John Harington. He and Tasso (Giarusalemme Liberata) are the giants of 16th century Italian poetry and the mainstay of opera librettists for the following two centuries. (Another fine Elizabethan translation, Fairfax’s Jerusalem Delivered).

I’d give my eyeteeth to be able to read them in the Italian.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 September 2007 08:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1226
Joined  2007-04-28

Mr Punch from seaside Punch and Judy Shows and also the magazine Punch is from an Italian character Pulcinella from commedia del’arte. Strings of sausages rather than burgers involved in Punch and Judy Shows.
I also took it that the Brit Wimpy chain got their name from the Popeye character. Wimpy’s were greasy spoons really, at least in the ‘70s

Profile
 
 
   
3 of 4
3
 
‹‹ Countervailing Power      Descriptor Bloat ››