Neologistic pronouns, or just previously unknown to me? 
Posted: 30 November 2013 09:08 AM   [ Ignore ]
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http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/viewart/20131130/NEWS04/131130004/-Preferred-pronouns-gain-traction-US-colleges

This article mentions a number of “English” pronouns I hadn’t seen before.  These include ze, sie, e, ou and ve.

Are these terms, as English pronouns, recent inventions, or do they have some history?

Oxforddictionaries.com tells me that “ou” is:

noun

a fruit-eating Hawaiian honeycreeper with a stout bill and green and yellow plumage. Compare with o-o.

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Posted: 30 November 2013 09:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The article you cite says that these are neologisms and time will tell whether or not they stick. The pronoun “they” as a singular indicator for “he or she” or “their” for “his or hers” took some time. But it has found an honorable place in even some formal writing.

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Posted: 30 November 2013 11:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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You’re right, Oecolampadius, at least as far as “ze” is concerned.  I didn’t see the others identified as neologisms, but I may have missed something.

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Posted: 30 November 2013 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The article you cite says that these are neologisms and time will tell whether or not they stick.

It is pretty much a given that these will not stick. The last time English added a pronoun to its repertoire was 800 years ago; it was they. Pronouns are called “closed-class” words for a reason. They don’t change readily. They’re somewhat more likely to shift in number or exactly what they refer to, as they has done recently and you has done in the past.

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