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Shatments
Posted: 08 December 2013 04:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Some lumber measurements (in the U.S.) are in “board feet”, or the dimensions of the wood before drying, which is why a 2x4 is 1-1/2"x3-1/2".  Luckily this does not apply to length so an 8-foot 2x4 is really 8 regular feet long.

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Posted: 08 December 2013 11:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Thanks, jtab.  After reading your post I spent a happy hour investigating the astonishingly complex world of lumber measurement --- discovering things like the Hoppus foot and the Petrograd standard....fascinating!

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Posted: 09 December 2013 10:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Once upon a time, a long time ago (and it feels it) people living on a small island off the coast of Europe worked in a very mixed up way for measures and currency.  The poor school children had to deal with this, and to help you picture the issues there follows a fictitious but not inaccurate example of a typical “problem” set to be worked out:
“You have £10 5s and 6d.  You buy 2 yds 1 foot and 3 inches of material that costs 2s and 5d per yard, and 5 Stone 2lbs 6oz of potatoes that cost 1s 7d per Stone.  How much money have you got left?”

So working in combinations of base 3, 12, 14, 16 and 20.  No wonder that when I came across binary, octal and hexadecimal the concepts were easy to grasp.

Now ask me if I think metric measures and decimal currency may have some benefits!

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Posted: 09 December 2013 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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steve_g - 09 December 2013 10:11 AM

Once upon a time, a long time ago (and it feels it) people living on a small island off the coast of Europe worked in a very mixed up way for measures and currency.  The poor school children had to deal with this, and to help you picture the issues there follows a fictitious but not inaccurate example of a typical “problem” set to be worked out:
“You have £10 5s and 6d.  You buy 2 yds 1 foot and 3 inches of material that costs 2s and 5d per yard, and 5 Stone 2lbs 6oz of potatoes that cost 1s 7d per Stone.  How much money have you got left?”

So working in combinations of base 3, 12, 14, 16 and 20.  No wonder that when I came across binary, octal and hexadecimal the concepts were easy to grasp.

Now ask me if I think metric measures and decimal currency may have some benefits!

Do you think metric measures and decimal currency may have some benefits?

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