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Posted: 13 January 2014 10:24 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Is there a name for words one mispronounces in one’s head having never heard anyone say them?
For example, awe-ree for awry or e-we for ewe. They are not eggcorns because not misspelled.

I admitted to a few in another thread eg Job, Goethe and Nietzsche though those are a bit highfalutin. I remember my father telling me he knew someone who pronounced naked to rhyme with faked though that might conceivably have been Yorkshire dialect. I heard my father mispronounce awry, the first time I had ever heard him use the word, when he was 80.

Does anyone else have other interesting examples, even from their own past?

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Posted: 13 January 2014 11:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Many personal examples were shared in this thread: Words that misled in youth.

I know of no specific name for such words.

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Posted: 13 January 2014 12:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I don’t know a specific name either.

But I don’t think the phenomenon is restricted to youth or to words you’ve never heard pronounced. I consistently pronounce misled in my head as if it were the past tense of to misle. I “know better” but that doesn’t seem to matter.

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Posted: 13 January 2014 01:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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As a precociously literate child I read Mary Renault’s The King Must Die, and read impious (which cropped up a lot, Bronze Age religion being such a main theme of the book) as ‘imp-ious’, and assumed it meant something like ‘naughty and disrespectful’. As that fitted into context reasonably well, it was quite a few years before the penny dropped.

And in our nearest village, the 18th-century bakery was converted in the 1970s into a wine bar. The owner told my parents that an elderly local got into the habit of dropping in and asking for ‘a slice of kwich’, and nobody had the heart to tell him that quiche isn’t pronounced that way.

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Posted: 13 January 2014 02:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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As a precociously literate child I read Mary Renault’s The King Must Die, and read impious (which cropped up a lot, Bronze Age religion being such a main theme of the book) as ‘imp-ious’

According to the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s dictionary, that’s one of the ways the word is ordinarily pronounced in the US. I wouldn’t be surprised if the OED offered it as an acceptable pronunciation, too.

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Posted: 13 January 2014 02:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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That’s the only pronunciation the OED gives (as mentioned in the old thread I linked to: this came up then, too).

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Posted: 13 January 2014 03:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Dr. Techie - 13 January 2014 02:30 PM

That’s the only pronunciation the OED gives (as mentioned in the old thread I linked to: this came up then, too).

Yeah but that’s just weird.

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Posted: 13 January 2014 10:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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venomousbede - 13 January 2014 10:24 AM
Is there a name for words one mispronounces in one’s head having never heard anyone say them?

Cacoëpy, incorrect pronunciation; bad pronunciation (opposed to orthoëpy)

I understand that it does not specifically answer your question, but usually when one mispronounces a word he/she usually never heard it pronounced before. And then some people mispronounce words because they’ve heard them mispronounced before.

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Posted: 14 January 2014 04:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Yeah, I wince every time I hear impious pronounced that way. The OED entry is old, apparently untouched since 1899. My money is that the OED got it from an Oxbridge inkhorn pronunciation based on the Latin impius.

Another one is cache, which is often pronounced like cachet. That one is so often mispronounced that in reading I recently ran across a sentence that went something like, “They needed more, so she delved into her cash.” I was so used to mentally correcting the cache/cachet pronunciation that I immediately thought people were starting to botch the spelling too. But I kept reading and it turned out the writer was referring to the currency in her wallet.

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Posted: 14 January 2014 05:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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The word pouffe (as in ‘backless leather/fabric-covered seat’) in Rightpondia has the disadvantage of being a homophone of poof, which over here means ‘homosexual’, not in a good way. About 25 years ago my parents were in a furniture shop and encountered a salesman (rather camp himself, my father reported) whi insisted that the item of furniture was pronounced ‘poufay’. Has anyone else ever heard that?

By the way, poofy in Rightpondia doesn’t mean ‘fluffy’ or ‘puffed out’; it’s just not known over here. The first time I read an allusion to ‘a big poofy dress’, I envisaged something appropriate for an exhibitionist gay transvestite…

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Posted: 14 January 2014 06:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Yeah, I wince every time I hear impious pronounced that way. The OED entry is old, apparently untouched since 1899. My money is that the OED got it from an Oxbridge inkhorn pronunciation based on the Latin impius.

Huh?  I pronounce it that way, and I never went to Oxbridge.  Why would you wince at hearing a perfectly good pronunciation?  “Well, it’s in the dictionary, but I don’t like it, so it must be wrong!”

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Posted: 14 January 2014 07:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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You’re right of course. But it just strikes me that if you don’t pronounce pious as pius, then it’s odd to pronounce impious that way. It’s not like I go around correcting people’s pronunciation of the word.

BTW, I rarely hear impious pronounced as impius at the Centre for Medieval Studies. And the word is thrown around a lot there.

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Posted: 14 January 2014 08:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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languagehat - 14 January 2014 06:34 AM

Yeah, I wince every time I hear impious pronounced that way. The OED entry is old, apparently untouched since 1899. My money is that the OED got it from an Oxbridge inkhorn pronunciation based on the Latin impius.

Huh?  I pronounce it that way, and I never went to Oxbridge.

Same here.

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Posted: 14 January 2014 09:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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But it just strikes me that if you don’t pronounce pious as pius, then it’s odd to pronounce impious that way.

How do you pronounce infamous?

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Posted: 17 January 2014 06:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Seriously, how do you pronounce infamous?  I’m curious to know if your (im)pious consistency is consistent.

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Posted: 17 January 2014 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I’m pleading Emerson. “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.”

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