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flaccid and other “skunked” words
Posted: 21 January 2014 04:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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jtab4994 - 20 January 2014 07:45 AM

OP Tipping - 20 January 2014 07:00 AM

Can we think of other -cci- or -cce- words pronunced without a /k/, other than those of Italian origin?

At work I routinely hear the word “accessorial” pronounced like the “cc” was “ss”.  The context is “accessorial charges” such as tolls or demurrage charged by a trucking company in addition to the regular freight fee.

Mmmm, but this is not a standard pronunciation for that word.

I remember that dreadful Supernanny person on TV used to say “unacceptable” with the -cc- pronounced as an /s/. I think this was just a personal quirk rather than an acknowledged, widespread variant.

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Posted: 21 January 2014 06:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I find myself squirming helplessly, impaled on the needle point of Lionello’s nit-picker.

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Posted: 23 January 2014 11:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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How about “sober”, which nowadays is rarely used to signify anything other than “not inebriated”.

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Posted: 23 January 2014 11:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Giving it some sober thought Dr T., I think that Lionello considers it a leiber of love! ;-)

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Posted: 24 January 2014 01:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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More a labour of leib, I think.

Apparently those very clever interpretations of CMG, KCMG and GCMG cited by Dr. T. appeared in the brilliant TV series “Yes, Minister”. I don’t know if that was the original source, though I don’t see why it shouldn’t have been --- the authors of that series, and of “Yes, Prime Minister” which followed it, were superb masters of satirical wit, in my opinion --- right up there with W.S. Gilbert and Noel Coward.

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Posted: 24 January 2014 03:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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lionello - 24 January 2014 01:10 AM

Apparently those very clever interpretations of CMG, KCMG and GCMG cited by Dr. T. appeared in the brilliant TV series “Yes, Minister”. I don’t know if that was the original source, though I don’t see why it shouldn’t have been

Because it wasn’t. I’d heard it before the series, and you can find it in Anthony Sampson’s Anatomy of Britain Today, published in 1965.

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Posted: 24 January 2014 05:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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thank you, Syntinen Laulu.  Anyway, kudos (lots of them ;-) to whoever first thought of it.

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Posted: 05 February 2014 08:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Intercourse used to have a much wider range of applications.

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Posted: 05 February 2014 03:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Dr. Techie - 05 February 2014 08:46 AM

Intercourse used to have a much wider range of applications.

It sure did

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Posted: 05 February 2014 08:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Dr. Techie - 05 February 2014 08:46 AM

Intercourse used to have a much wider range of applications.

I know I can’t use it in a sermon without lots of adjectives in front of it.

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Posted: 06 February 2014 12:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Keep up the good work, Oecolampadius. Intercourse deserves a whole pile of adjectives. Parthenogenesis just doesn’t bear comparison.

;-)

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Posted: 07 February 2014 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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BTW I was not previously familiar with this word “skunked”. Cheers.

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Posted: 10 February 2014 08:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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The obvious one for me is Holocaust. I recall hearing a Goon show years ago and one of the characters was describing something dreadful. He said something like “Avalanche might be a better word. I’d even go so far as to say an ‘olocaust” The event he was referring to was not connected to the Nazi slaughter of last century. We’re talking the 50’s when Milligan wrote it. For me, ‘holocaust’ has always meant the Nazi slaughter. I’m 49 years old, so to my ear it had taken on one meaning by the 70s.

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