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Pair of stairs
Posted: 17 September 2007 05:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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’ghits’ made immediate sense to me, and the problem with hyphens is they tend to disappear once a hypehnated phrase/word pair becomes common anyway, so I suppose we might as well not bother to put one in in the first place.

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Posted: 17 September 2007 11:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthimeria says antimeria is better.
When I first mentioned the word which was new to me I followed my source’s brief definition ie using one part of speech for another and I later suggested peanut brittle, the rich (adjectives to nouns) and to impact, to trend (nouns to verbs) which seem to fit the definition.
Now we have enellage as well. Great new dinner party words!

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Posted: 20 September 2007 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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lionello - 16 September 2007 08:29 AM

Monosyllabic “ghit” also jostles uncomfortably against another good old English word, more commonly spelt “git”, meaning (roughly) “a socially undesirable person” --- “Piss off, yer miserable foocking git!”

I have just had it pointed out to me that “git” “ought to be” pronounced with a soft g, like “gin”, or is it the other way around?  Is there a way of denoting that a g is hard, like putting a silent e in front of it denotes that it is soft, as in George?

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Posted: 20 September 2007 01:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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silent e in front of it denotes that it is soft, as in George

eGeorege?

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Posted: 20 September 2007 11:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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Touche! Sorry, not concentrating…

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Posted: 21 September 2007 03:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
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I have just had it pointed out to me that “git” “ought to be” pronounced with a soft g, like “gin”

gill
give
gimmick
giddy

seems there aren’t many rules in English that can’t be broken

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Posted: 21 September 2007 04:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
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"gill”, of course, can be pronounced both ways - I’m sure you remember the old measurement of 1/6th of a gill....

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