Gusset
Posted: 11 February 2014 06:49 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Sometimes an etymology is simply perfect. From OED:

Etymology:  < Old French gouchet, gousset (13th cent. in Hatzfeld & Darmesteter), apparently < gousse shell of nuts

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Posted: 11 February 2014 12:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Three cheers for aldi!

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Posted: 11 February 2014 03:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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That’s too perfect!

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Posted: 12 February 2014 01:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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a bit too perfect, but close.  Gousse is the thin layer round the seeds of legumes.

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Posted: 12 February 2014 07:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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steve_g - 12 February 2014 01:15 AM

a bit too perfect, but close.  Gousse is the thin layer round the seeds of legumes.

Was that it’s definition in the 13th century? Seems unlikely, given that “legume” is a 17th century idea.

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Posted: 12 February 2014 11:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yes, sorry, shall try to make my self more coherent, but note that the earlier post was made pre-vin rouge, and this one post, making it a post post. ( I hope Lionello may know what I mean)

I wasn’t there with a recording device, but the opinion is that gousse refers to the thinner /finer seed coverings (pericarps) as typified by the legumes.  While the classification and term may be more recent, such plants and seeds have been around and important to humans a while longer ;-)

Such seed coverings open up as the seed disperses, reminding people (or so the theory goes) of an armpit, which is what gousset referred to in the C13th and 12th.  By the early C14th, the term was used for the piece of armour protecting the armpit.

Not sure at what point it made it into English in its current usage and form.

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Posted: 13 February 2014 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Balzac would have loved it. I’ve always liked the name cache-sexe especially after seeing topless women in them in St Tropez in the late 1970s. Their men wore them too and sported male tote-bags. You’d never see that on a British beach. It’s a legacy of the Victorians.

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Posted: 13 February 2014 10:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Nice one, V/bede. (Balzac!).  But, going by the illustration accompanying your referenced website, I would have thought that cache-vingt-deux would have been more appropriate!

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