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Chambers 13th edition dictionary
Posted: 18 April 2014 01:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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lionello - 18 April 2014 08:01 AM
This delightfully contentious thread (bordering, as it does at times, on acrimony) gives me the opportunity to describe it with a word I’ve been aware of for many years, but have never had a chance to use: logomachy.

Logomachy must be a nonce word. “I’M JOKING!!”

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Posted: 18 April 2014 03:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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You must have some sort of pocket version; the “real” AHD (publisher’s page) has perhaps the best etymologies of any American dictionary, not to mention being a gorgeous book—I highly recommend it.

No, I have the hard cover third edition, and I agree, it’s a fine dictionary, and the one I use most of the time. However, there are certain words it does not contain, for this reason I thought the Chambers would accommodate me for the more unusual words.

I’m going to pass on the Chambers.  I do have the 20-volume OED and it certainly has a plethora of unusual words, but a little less convenient than a one-volume or even two-volume dictionary, which I can keep on my desk or carry from one room to the next.

Thanks for the suggestion

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Posted: 18 April 2014 04:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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So your hard-cover, 3rd edition AHD does not contain etymologies, as you stated in your second post in this thread?

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Posted: 18 April 2014 04:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Sad that none of the sniglets, or entries in The Meaning of Liff, took off the way cromulant and diegogarcity did.

WRT this talk of pocket this and twenty volume that… I seriously think I’m never going to buy another paper dictionary.

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Posted: 18 April 2014 09:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Dr. Techie - 18 April 2014 04:40 PM

So your hard-cover, 3rd edition AHD does not contain etymologies, as you stated in your second post in this thread?

I’m impressed with the punctiliousness of all the members on this forum. I will choose my words more carefully and dot all my i’s and t’s.

My AHD does contain etymologies, but contains a limited amount of archaic and unusual words.

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Posted: 18 April 2014 10:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Thank you for kilfud-yoking, kurwamac.  How do the Scots produce words like this in such abundance? Reading Burns silently is like listening to music inside one’s head (though I guess that’s true of any really great poetry)

I was going to ask you how kiagh is pronounced, but found the pronunciation on-line at Merriam-Webster. It reminds me of our cat, trying to get rid of a fishbone stuck it its throat.

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Posted: 19 April 2014 06:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Milton had no fondness for the Scots and their accent. When the Stuarts ascended the English throne they were followed into England by a swarm of Scots lords and their retainers looking to make their fortune south of the border, raising much resentment in many Englishmen and incidentally introducing them to many alien names for the first time which would later grow familiar.

Milton’s Sonnet 11, On The Detraction Which Followed Upon The Writing of Certain Treatises, was published in 1645. The poet was disgruntled that his latest book, Tetrachordon, or Expositions upon the four chief places in Scripture, which treat of marriage, or nullities in marriage, had sold poorly, with some ‘stall-readers’ apparently balking at the term Tetrachordon ("Bless us”! what a word on a title-page is this!").

The sonnet continues,

................  Why is it harder, Sirs, than Gordon,,
Colkitto, or Macdonnel, or Galasp?†
Those rugged names to our like mouths grow sleek,
That would have made Quintillian stare and gasp;

The rugged names would indeed grow sleek to English mouths as Gordon, Colquhoun or Calhoun, MacDonald and Gillespie.

Quintilian of course was the 1st century Roman whose Institutio Oratoria was the gold standard in matters of style, oratory and rhetoric.

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