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The word “America” and it’s meaning
Posted: 21 April 2014 05:17 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello, let me introduce myself. My name is George and I’ve been dabbling with etymology for a bit. I discovered some clues in languages in general and I’ve applied this to certain words, including the word America. Now I don’t know how much headway people have made in finding out what the word actually means but I realized that it actually spells out ”In God We Trust” . This is how I broke it down: A*Mer*i*CA . It may seem strange the way I broke it up but if you study words, you will realize that Mer is the same as Mars (the God of War) and CA is the phonetic equivalent of KA (the spirit double of oneself, the one you trust) . The “i” in America refers to people, such as calling individuals that originate from Klon as Klonites or Kloni. Then there is the “A” in America, meaning simply “In”. It makes better sense when you have a Spanish language background.

As far as I know, nobody has publicly admitted that this is what America means even though it is plainly written on the back of the dollar bill. I suspect that those in the know, already know this but for some reason they have failed to pass on this knowledge to the historical societies. I get that the whole separation of Church and State is a huge factor and if people were to find out that this country (United State of America) was founded on the worship of this God named Mer, then all pandemonium would ensue or perhaps not. Either way, I would like to hear people’s opinion on this discovery I’ve made. I don’t know many scholars and those that I do know have not given me any feedback.

All this deciphering was accomplished by a technique I call proto-etymology. It is something I developed based on phonetic word origins stemming from Sumerian and sprinkled in all languages. It is based on the idea that all letters in the alphabet have certain values attached to them and if one were to apply these values to any common word, the definition of that word would be spelled out in the phrase that is produced when the individual letters are deciphered. I’ve done this with some varied success. Some of the values I’ve attached to certain letters need to be further tested. However, I believe that this can be the basis for understanding the connection of all languages with the roots they are derived from.

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Posted: 21 April 2014 05:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I hate to appear unwelcoming, but I think you’ve come to the wrong place.

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Posted: 21 April 2014 07:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Dr. Techie - 21 April 2014 05:41 PM

I hate to appear unwelcoming, but I think you’ve come to the wrong place.

What do you mean?  No one has any thoughts as to what I just proposed?  I must admit, I have not read much on this forum.  I was looking for a place where people discussed etymology.  It seemed that if you named a website WordOrigins.org , the subject of word origins would be discussed.  Tell me, why would I be in the wrong place?

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Posted: 21 April 2014 10:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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[

quote author="Agondontor" date="1398147472"]Hello, let me introduce myself. My name is George and I’ve been dabbling with etymology for a bit. I discovered some clues in languages in general and I’ve applied this to certain words, including the word America. Now I don’t know how much headway people have made in finding out what the word actually means but I realized that it actually spells out ”In God We Trust” . This is how I broke it down: A*Mer*i*CA . It may seem strange the way I broke it up but if you study words, you will realize that Mer is the same as Mars (the God of War) and CA is the phonetic equivalent of KA (the spirit double of oneself, the one you trust) . The “i” in America refers to people, such as calling individuals that originate from Klon as Klonites or Kloni. Then there is the “A” in America, meaning simply “In”. It makes better sense when you have a Spanish language background.

America was named after the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. There doesn’t seem to be any relationship to your etymology of the word.

AMERIGO

GENDER: Masculine
USAGE: Italian
PRONOUNCED: ah-me-REE-go [key]
Meaning & History
Medieval Italian form of EMMERICH. Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was the Italian explorer who gave the continent of America its name (from Americus, the Latin form of his name).

EMMERICH

GENDER: Masculine
USAGE: German, Ancient Germanic
PRONOUNCED: E-me-rikh (German) [key]
Meaning & History
Germanic name, in which the second element is ric meaning “power”. The first element may be ermen “whole, universal” (making it a relative of Ermenrich), amal “work, labour” (making it a relative of Amalric) or heim “home” (making it a relative of Henry). It is likely that several forms merged into a single name.

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Posted: 21 April 2014 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Using a technique I have called “etymo-proctology” (because of a gut-feeling I have about this thread), I am prepared to offer an alternative analysis of the name AMER*I*CA:

“AMER” = “Bitter” (in French Canadian, more or less)
“I” - the spirit, or geist, of the great Discoverer
“CA” = one-half of you-know what.

The Discoverer was expressing his bitter disappointment at finding a continent half-full of nondescript autochthones, most of them soon to die of smallpox and measles, instead of the fabled Indies.

Now take a look at this new poster’s name and username (welcome, George/Agondontor). A very slight rearrangement of the letters yields:

O, DON’T, GEORGE! (groan).

I can’t avoid the feeling that the Alpha Centaurians (or reasonable facsimile of same) are with us.

(withdraws, humming “Clang, clang, clang went the TROLLey” in a feeble imitation of Judy Garland)

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Posted: 21 April 2014 11:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Logophile - 21 April 2014 10:01 PM

[

quote author="Agondontor" date="1398147472"]Hello, let me introduce myself. My name is George and I’ve been dabbling with etymology for a bit. I discovered some clues in languages in general and I’ve applied this to certain words, including the word America. Now I don’t know how much headway people have made in finding out what the word actually means but I realized that it actually spells out ”In God We Trust” . This is how I broke it down: A*Mer*i*CA . It may seem strange the way I broke it up but if you study words, you will realize that Mer is the same as Mars (the God of War) and CA is the phonetic equivalent of KA (the spirit double of oneself, the one you trust) . The “i” in America refers to people, such as calling individuals that originate from Klon as Klonites or Kloni. Then there is the “A” in America, meaning simply “In”. It makes better sense when you have a Spanish language background.

America was named after the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. There doesn’t seem to be any relationship to your etymology of the word.

AMERIGO

GENDER: Masculine
USAGE: Italian
PRONOUNCED: ah-me-REE-go [key]
Meaning & History
Medieval Italian form of EMMERICH. Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was the Italian explorer who gave the continent of America its name (from Americus, the Latin form of his name).

EMMERICH

GENDER: Masculine
USAGE: German, Ancient Germanic
PRONOUNCED: E-me-rikh (German) [key]
Meaning & History
Germanic name, in which the second element is ric meaning “power”. The first element may be ermen “whole, universal” (making it a relative of Ermenrich), amal “work, labour” (making it a relative of Amalric) or heim “home” (making it a relative of Henry). It is likely that several forms merged into a single name.

This I knew. My interest was not in the first mentioned of the word or how it was phonetically changed or derived from another similarly sounding name. My interest is purely in the meaning of the word.

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Posted: 21 April 2014 11:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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lionello - 21 April 2014 11:29 PM

Using a technique I have called “etymo-proctology” (because of a gut-feeling I have about this thread), I am prepared to offer an alternative analysis of the name AMER*I*CA:

“AMER" = “Bitter” (in French Canadian, more or less)
“I” - the spirit, or geist, of the great Discoverer
“CA” = one-half of you-know what.

The Discoverer was expressing his bitter disappointment at finding a continent half-full of nondescript autochthones, most of them soon to die of smallpox and measles, instead of the fabled Indies.

Now take a look at this new poster’s name and username (welcome, George/Agondontor). A very slight rearrangement of the letters yields:

O, DON’T, GEORGE! (groan).

I can’t avoid the feeling that the Alpha Centaurians (or reasonable facsimile of same) are with us.

(withdraws, humming “Clang, clang, clang went the TROLLey” in a feeble imitation of Judy Garland)

Yes, it’s a technique based on the understanding of the first language, which is Sumerian in origin, unlike your made-up cynic-based alternative.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 02:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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lionello - 21 April 2014 11:29 PM


I can’t avoid the feeling that the Alpha Centaurians (or reasonable facsimile of same) are with us.

Or the Zeta Reticulans.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 02:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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DNFTT

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Posted: 22 April 2014 02:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Edited in line with Dave’s good advice.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 03:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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If the first post is satire, it is brilliant.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 05:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I highly doubt it’s satire; plenty of people indulge in that kind of abstract speculation on language without reference to (or with active contempt for) the “authorities,” and many of them have written books promoting their ideas.  I don’t think it’s kind or accurate to call the poster a troll, but of course I agree with Dr. T that the poster has come to the wrong place.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 05:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Well, what words *really* mean is important stuff and you can’t just let the common misconceptions run around without saying something.

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Posted: 22 April 2014 09:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Besides, everyone knows that these root sounds derive from Basque, not Sumerian.  Sheesh!

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Posted: 22 April 2014 12:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Like Languagehat, I took the first post to be that of a sincere crank. But the second one struck me as trollish. ("What me? What have I done? I’m merely engaging in conversation about the subject of this forum.")

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Posted: 22 April 2014 06:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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OK you bunch of Einsteins, then tell me why does the word “ENRI” means “King of the Jews” ?  According to scholars, this is exactly what it means.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Bible-Studies-1654/enri.htm

How is it that a few letters can make up a complete phrase?

What I proposed is guided by the same principle.  If any of you were to consider yourself authentic word smiths, you would investigate this further.  But if ignorance is your leisure, then by all means continue.

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