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The word “America” and it’s meaning
Posted: 26 April 2014 01:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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In those days your religion was liable to change depending on the religion of the king or queen.  William Byrd is a notable exception.

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Posted: 26 April 2014 04:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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Faldage - 26 April 2014 01:52 AM

In those days your religion was liable to change depending on the religion of the king or queen.  William Byrd is a notable exception.

True enough, but coincidentally the vicar just dropped in for tea so I’ll pass the baton to him.

In good King Charles’s golden days,
When Loyalty no harm meant;
A Furious High-Church man I was,
And so I gain’d Preferment.
Unto my Flock I daily Preach’d,
Kings are by God appointed,
And Damn’d are those who dare resist,
Or touch the Lord’s Anointed.

And this is law, I will maintain
Unto my Dying Day, Sir.
That whatsoever King may reign,
I will be the Vicar of Bray, Sir!

When Royal James possest the crown,
And popery grew in fashion;
The Penal Law I shouted down,
And read the Declaration:
The Church of Rome I found would fit
Full well my Constitution,
And I had been a Jesuit,
But for the Revolution.
And this is Law, &c.

When William our Deliverer came,
To heal the Nation’s Grievance,
I turn’d the Cat in Pan again,
And swore to him Allegiance:
Old Principles I did revoke,
Set conscience at a distance,
Passive Obedience is a Joke,
A Jest is non-resistance.
And this is Law, &c.

Sorry, I have cut you short but I take your point. More tea, Vicar?

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Posted: 27 April 2014 11:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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any ideas as to who wrote those superbly satirical lines, aldi? The name “Pope” of course comes immediately to mind (who didn’t he make fun of?) but I suppose there are lots of other candidates.

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Posted: 28 April 2014 08:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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Not attributed to Pope but to a unnamed Tory satirist of the 1720s so it’s his era. That date though applies to the song in its present form, its original goes back much further. From OED:

Bray is the village of that name near Maidenhead in Berkshire. According to Fuller (see ref. below) the ‘vivacious vicar’ held the benefice from the reign of Henry VIII to that of Elizabeth, and was twice a Catholic and twice a Protestant. In the later song, to which the currency of the phrase is mainly due, the sovereigns under whom the vicar successively changes his religion and politics are those from Charles II to George I.

[a1661 T. Fuller Worthies (1662) Berks. 82 But first we will dispatch that sole Proverb of this County, viz. The Vicar of Bray, will be Vicar of Bray still.
c1720 Song, Vicar of Bray (Chorus), This is the law, I will maintain, Until my dying day, Sir, That whatsoever King may reign, Still I’ll be the Vicar of Bray, Sir.

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Posted: 28 April 2014 09:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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Ta, aldi. Didn’t know that the Vicar’s religious versatility was already proverbial as early as the 1660’s.

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Posted: 28 April 2014 12:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
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I can’t say I blame the old rector. Four switches may be excessive but given that the wrong religion under the Tudors could find you roasting your nuts over an open fire it’s certainly understandable.

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Posted: 29 April 2014 06:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
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Yes, I much prefer cheerful Vicars of Bray to grim ideologues.

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Posted: 30 April 2014 01:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 53 ]
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Thanks for the laugh guys, you’ve all proven to be trolls yourself, almost incestuous if you ask me.  But you wont, you’ll just ask each other, like a happy little group of “word smiths”.  This place isn’t worth my energy.

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Posted: 30 April 2014 11:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 54 ]
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This place isn’t worth my energy.

Hooray.

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Posted: 01 May 2014 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 55 ]
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I thought there was secular/erotic Donne (berating “a busie old fool, unruly sun” or something for rising after a night’s carnal conjugation) and religious Donne after he converted and started sermonizing as well as religious poetry as aldi says ("for whom the bell tolls” etc).

Wordsmiths like Donne fashion words and phrases, they don’t research word origins.

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Posted: 02 June 2014 01:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 56 ]
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happydog - 24 April 2014 09:44 AM

ENRI is an initialism - here’s the definition of an initialism.

The word America is not an initialism, so the ideas that apply to initialisms simply do not apply to the word America.

Another important concept about language that you’re ignoring is that words have no intrinsic meanings; they mean whatever we use them to mean and the majority rules. If you want to invent a secret “meaning” then go ahead, but that’s just a game you’re playing with yourself.

That is where you are wrong. Individual letters do have value.  Just as a chemist understands the different molecules and how they eventually form together to create mass, this is what is similarly happening to words.  Right now, you’re all just pharmacist who know little about how things are made yet you know what things are for.  You are afraid to delve deeper either out of sheer ignorance or some sick pride.  But go on, congratulate yourselves on a job well done. You’ve kept the pharmacy running.

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Posted: 02 June 2014 01:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 57 ]
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Sorry.... continue with your circle jerk. LOL

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