H for retirement
Posted: 05 May 2014 08:36 AM   [ Ignore ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2032
Joined  2007-02-19

Aldi’s mention of age 65 ("maybe not so bad after all”, he says ---personally, I can’t remember) brought to mind an alphabet remembered from the days of my youth: A for ‘Orses, B for Mutton, C for ‘th Highlanders, D for Kate, E for Or, F for Vescence, etc. I don’t remember ever hearing a satisfactory term for “W”. Does anybody here know one? As for “Z”, the feeble best I ever heard was “Z for Breezes”, with Z pronounced á l’Américaine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 May 2014 09:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  844
Joined  2007-03-01

I remember:
A for ‘orses
B for mutton
C for yourself / C for Thighlanders
D for ential
E for brick
F for vescence
G for police
H for consent
I for Novello
J for oranges
K for teria
L for leather
M for sis
N for a dig)
O for the wings of a dove
P for a penny
Q for a bus
R for mo
S for Williams
U for mism
V for La France (Vive La France)
W for quits
X for breakfast (eggs for breakfast)
Y for husband / Y for mistress
Z for breezes

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 May 2014 11:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2032
Joined  2007-02-19

Good for you, Syntinen Laulu! Of course, there are variants, as in all great literature handed down by word of mouth: N for lope, P for relief, M for size, etc. “W for quits” always sounded a bit contrived to me; nobody actually ever says that.  I was hoping for something a bit better. Thanks anyway.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 May 2014 02:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1297
Joined  2007-03-21

I had no idea what this was on about (since you didn’t use Cockney alphabet in the title). Finally found it on Wikipedia:

In the 1930s, the comedy double act Clapham and Dwyer recorded the following version:

A for ‘orses (hay for horses)
B for mutton (beef or mutton)
C for ‘th highlanders (Seaforth Highlanders)
D for ‘ential (deferential)
E for Adam (Eve or Adam)
F for ‘vescence (effervescence)
G for police (Chief of police)
H for respect (age for respect)
I for Novello (Ivor Novello)
J for oranges (Jaffa oranges)
K for ‘ancis, (Kay Francis), or K for undressing
L for leather (Hell for leather)
M for ‘sis (emphasis)
N for ‘adig (in for a dig, or infradig)
O for the garden wall (over the garden wall)
P for a penny (pee for a penny)
Q for a song (cue for a song), or Q for billiards (cue for billiards)
R for mo’ (half a mo’)
S for you (it’s for you)
T for two (tea for two)
U for films (UFA films)
V for La France (Vive La France)
W for a bob (double you for a bob)
X for breakfast (eggs for breakfast)
Y for Gawd’s sake (why, for God’s sake)
Z for breezes (zephyr breezes: see West wind)

The (many) variations are also there.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 May 2014 04:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3537
Joined  2007-01-29

Thanks, Oeco!  I could figure out most of them, but “C for ‘th highlanders” was opaque to me (not surprisingly, since I’ve never heard of the Seaforth Highlanders).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 May 2014 08:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2032
Joined  2007-02-19

Sorry about the opacity, friends. I should have realized how thoroughly Rightpondian and regional that alphabet is.

“W for a bob” is a big improvement. Ta muchly, Oeco.

[ Edited: 05 May 2014 09:04 PM by lionello ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 May 2014 03:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2344
Joined  2007-01-30

I hadn’t come across this before. It’s nice to see one of my favourites, American actress Kay Francis, turn up in one of the lists. She was an enormous movie star in the 30s, now sadly remembered only by aficionados of old films like myself.

I assume E for brick in the first version is ‘eave a brick? Eve or Adam is much better.

Profile