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blood is thicker than water
Posted: 12 May 2014 09:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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I withdraw the self-criticism, and apologize for any offense I might have caused myself.

What an elegant apology, Dr. T.! Who could fail to be moved? I am sure you have emerged from this potentially conflict-fraught episode with not a feather [figurative, of course] ruffled.  Handsome is as handsome does.

(totters off groggily, bottle in hand, trailing several sheets [mostly A4] in the wind, and hoarsely intoning “Can you Canoe me up the River, like You Did in Last Night’s Near-Dry Dream”

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Posted: 12 May 2014 11:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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sorry, folks. For the record: I got it wrong. The lyrics are “Can I canoe you up the river”.....

Swamp Memory is obviously drying up, like last night’s dream....

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Posted: 14 May 2014 07:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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lionello - 10 May 2014 09:18 PM
not that a canoe is really nautical

I find it difficult to agree with this statement, which appears to me to imply that “ really nautical” and “salt water”, “open sea”, etc., must necessarily go together. Are the ships that ply the Great Lakes, the Amazon, the Danube, then, less “nautical” than those that brave the Altlantic rollers?  Or is a canoe perhaps disqualified from being “really nautical” because of its size (in which case, what dimension, or group of dimensions, would be involved in the qualifying test --- beam, length, displacement?)?

I concur with Dr.Techie, even though he’s not that emphatic with his claim.  A canoe is not categorized as a naval(nautical) vessel. A canoe is not equipped to navigate the great oceans. While I understand that canoeing is a challenging sport and was a method of transportation in the Amazon, North America and Polynesia; nevertheless, a canoe can not be defined as nautical. Nautical as the word is defined.

OED

canoe, n.
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Pronunciation:
/kəˈnuː/
Forms:  α. 15–17 canoa, 16 cannoa; β. 15–17 canow(e, 16 cannow(e, canou(e, 16–17 canoo; γ. 16– caano, cano, 16–17 cannoe, 17– canoe.(Show Less)
Etymology:  In 16th cent. canoa, < Spanish canoa, < canoa, the name (in a Central American Indian language) encountered by Columbus in Haiti. Canoa continued in English use into the 18th cent., but before 1600 there appeared a parallel form canow, used with varieties of spelling into the 18th cent., which was apparently an English modification of canoa; in the course of the 17th cent. appeared the forms caano, cano, canno, canoo, cannoe, and canoe, of which cano is also the Dutch, and canoe an earlier French form (in Cauxois’ translation of Acosta 1600).
(The modern French canot is considered by Diez and Scheler a diminutive of Old French cane ship, boat (probably of Germanic origin: compare Low German kane, Dutch kaan, German kahn, also Latin canna small vessel, gondola); but it is perhaps the word canoe spelt according to a mistaken etymology. It is not however the equivalent of canoe in English, but means simply ‘little boat’.)
(Show Less)
1. A kind of simple, keelless boat:
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a. Originally applied to those of the West Indian aborigines, which were hollowed out of a single tree-trunk, and thence to those of other primitive societies, or of prehistoric cultures, of this construction.

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b. Extended to those of other societies and other construction, and used generally for any roughly-made craft used by American Indians, Malayo-Polynesians, etc.; most of these use paddles instead of oars, whence ‘canoe’ is sometimes understood to be any vessel propelled by paddles (cf. sense 2).
α.
a. A small light sort of boat or skiff propelled by paddling, used chiefly for recreation in Europe, North America, etc.

Nautic
Pronunciation:
Brit. /ˈnɔːtɪk/ , U.S. /ˈnɔdɪk/ , /ˈnɑdɪk/
Forms:  16 nautick, 16 nautike, 16– nautic.
Etymology:  < Middle French, French nautique of or relating to sailors (early 16th cent.), of or relating to navigation (mid 16th cent.), and its etymon classical Latin nauticus of or relating to ships, seafaring < ancient Greek ναυτικός of or belonging to ships, seafaring < ναύτης sailor (see -naut comb. form) + -ικός -ic suffix. Compare earlier nautical adj. With use as noun compare earlier nautical n.(Show Less)

Online Etymology Dictionary

nautical (adj.)
1550s, from -al (1) + nautic from Middle French nautique, from Latin nauticus “pertaining to ships or sailors,” from Greek nautikos “seafaring, naval,” from nautes “sailor,” from naus “ship,” from PIE *nau- (2) “boat” (see naval).

Etymology-Online.com
nautical

Definition of nautical:
• Pertaining to ships, sailors, or navigation: naval: marine.
• Of or relating to ships or seamen; naval.

Merriam Webster
• nau·ti·cal adjective \ˈnȯ-ti-kəl, ˈnä-\
• : relating to ships and sailing
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Full Definition of NAUTICAL
of, relating to, or associated with seamen, navigation, or ships
Synonyms: nautical, marine, maritime, naval

The Free Dictionary:

These adjectives mean of or relating to the sea, ships, shipping, sailors, or navigation: nautical charts; marine insurance; maritime law; a naval officer.

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Posted: 14 May 2014 11:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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A canoe is not equipped to navigate the great oceans.

In case it was missed, I’ll repeat:

The islands of the Pacific, from New Zealand to Hawaii to Easter Island, were all colonised by people using nothing but canoes. We don’t have any oceans greater than the Pacific. History is against you on this one, logophile.

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Posted: 14 May 2014 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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OP Tipping - 14 May 2014 11:33 AM

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A canoe is not equipped to navigate the great oceans.

In case it was missed, I’ll repeat:

The islands of the Pacific, from New Zealand to Hawaii to Easter Island, were all colonised by people using nothing but canoes. We don’t have any oceans greater than the Pacific. History is against you on this one, logophile.

This is true, but how well equipped were they compared to ships and other much larger vessels. Regardless, my contention is on the word nautical and it doesn’t seem associated with canoeing.

Origin:
1545–55; < Latin nautic ( us ) pertaining to ships or sailors (< Greek nautikós, equivalent to naû ( s ) ship + -tikos -tic) + -al1

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Posted: 17 May 2014 09:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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why blood is thicker than water

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Posted: 19 May 2014 11:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Regardless, my contention is on the word nautical and it doesn’t seem associated with canoeing.

Though if you lived in, say, Western Samoa, you might think differently.

why blood is thicker than water

It’s a traditional English saying to explain or justify helping or giving preference to one’s own kin.

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