BL: undermine, mine
Posted: 29 June 2014 05:00 AM   [ Ignore ]
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One of the few words from English with a Celtic root, but still via Norman French.

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Posted: 29 June 2014 06:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Þe wal of babilon [...] with vndermynyng shal ben vndermyned.

Man, Wyclif was crying out for a copyeditor.

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Posted: 30 June 2014 02:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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languagehat - 29 June 2014 06:35 AM

Þe wal of babilon [...] with vndermynyng shal ben vndermyned.

Man, Wyclif was crying out for a copyeditor.

I thought the same thing on reading that line.  My reaction was that it might could have been echoing a Hebrew poetic trope of repetition.

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Posted: 30 June 2014 05:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Faldage - 30 June 2014 02:36 AM

I thought the same thing on reading that line.  My reaction was that it might could have been echoing a Hebrew poetic trope of repetition.

Good catch Faldage!  עַרְעֵר תִּתְעַרְעָר is literally broken with brokenness or undermined with undermining. See here. My wife uses this format often. “That guy is dead, dead” she might say after a bad guy was beaten down in a cop show. The AV translates it as “Utterly broken” suggesting that the first ‘arar is an adverbial intensifier of some sort.

edit: This construction is fairly common in biblical Hebrew. In Isaiah 29:9 the AV does repeat the repetition, “Stay yourselves, and wonder; cry ye out, and cry: they are drunken, but not with wine; they stagger, but not with strong drink.”

Interestingly the repetition of “evermore and evermore” of Isaiah 34:10 is preserved in a well-known 13th c. Plainsong chant “Of the Father’s Love Begotten” (actually a 4th c. poem). It is repeated at the end of all four verses.

[ Edited: 01 July 2014 06:15 AM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 30 June 2014 12:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Faldage and Oeco have it absolutely right: This doubling up of the verb is often used in the Hebrew Bible as an intensifier, which in the KJV is sometimes rendered as “surely”:

Yavo: He will come. Bo yavo: He will surely come.

Yippol: It will fall. Pol yippol: It will surely fall.

Judges 13, 22:  And Manoah said unto his wife: mot namut— we shall surely die, for we have seen God.  Namut: we shall die. Mot namut: we are D-E-D dead, baby….. (tips hat to Mme. Oeco)

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Posted: 30 June 2014 03:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yeah, I figured that’s what it was, but it still tickled my funnybone.

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Posted: 30 June 2014 04:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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lionello - 30 June 2014 12:47 PM

Faldage and Oeco have it absolutely right:

Don’t let my wife know.  I’m dangerously close to my quota of being right for the year.

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