HD: If We Won
Posted: 05 July 2014 03:36 AM   [ Ignore ]
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A Fourth-of-July-themed beer commercial ponders linguistic differences between the States and the mother country.

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Posted: 05 July 2014 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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That was funny. I noted his pronunciation of mushy peas as mooshy peas. In my experience it’s always been mushy peas as in lush, rush, etc. What say my compatriots here? (And you guys in the US if in fact that delicacy has crossed the pond.)

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Posted: 05 July 2014 12:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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"Mushy peas” isn’t a thing over here, but his pronunciation is about how we’d say it when describing the state of peas that come out of a can, or “tin”.  Perhaps since he was addressing an American audience he pronounced it for our ears?

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Posted: 05 July 2014 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I lived a number of years in the U.K., and never heard there of mushy peas. A friend of mine in Toronto says that in Eastern Canada, at least, they’re a traditional dish—and he calls them “mooshy peas”.

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Posted: 05 July 2014 04:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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In my experience it’s always been mushy peas as in lush, rush, etc.

As noted, “mushy peas” are not a thing over here, but my normal pronunciation of “mushy” is as aldi describes, not “mooshy”.

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Posted: 06 July 2014 04:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Dr. Techie - 05 July 2014 04:41 PM

In my experience it’s always been mushy peas as in lush, rush, etc.

As noted, “mushy peas” are not a thing over here, but my normal pronunciation of “mushy” is as aldi describes, not “mooshy”.

Which assumes aldi’s pronunciation of lush and rush are the same as your pronunciation of them.  Is it /l ʌ ʃ/, /r ʌ ʃ/ or /l ʊ ʃ /, /r ʊ ʃ/?

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Posted: 06 July 2014 07:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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jtab4994 - 05 July 2014 12:19 PM

… his pronunciation is about how we’d say it ...

I guess I should just speak for myself.  For me “mushy” rhymes with “pushy”.  Northeastern U.S.

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Posted: 06 July 2014 10:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Faldage - 06 July 2014 04:04 AM

Dr. Techie - 05 July 2014 04:41 PM
In my experience it’s always been mushy peas as in lush, rush, etc.

As noted, “mushy peas” are not a thing over here, but my normal pronunciation of “mushy” is as aldi describes, not “mooshy”.

Which assumes aldi’s pronunciation of lush and rush are the same as your pronunciation of them.  Is it /l ʌ ʃ/, /r ʌ ʃ/ or /l ʊ ʃ /, /r ʊ ʃ/?

My pronunciation of rush is /rʌʃ/ .

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Posted: 06 July 2014 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Ditto.

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Posted: 06 July 2014 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Shouldn’t it be: “If we had won”?

That is to say, if the Brits had won, grammar would have been and henceforth forever shall have been infinitely better.

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