New English
Posted: 12 September 2007 07:59 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Just a vagrant thought. Is New English used at all for things connected with New England? For example, “The New English are in general affable folk”.

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Posted: 12 September 2007 08:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Never heard it so used.  “New Englanders” is what I would say.

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Posted: 12 September 2007 10:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yes.  OED:

New English, a. and n.

A. adj. Of, relating to, or characteristic of New England or its inhabitants; (also) spec. relating to New England theology (see NEW ENGLAND n. 2).
1632 in Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll. (1863) 4th Ser. VI. 184 Tis a ridle as yet to me whether you meane any Elder in these New English churches. 1647 N. WARD Simple Cobler Aggawam 53 It is.. as empty as a New-English purse. 1713 S. SEWALL Diary 16 Sept., An August Speech, Shewing the Validity and Antiquity of New English Ordinations. 1863 ‘G. HAMILTON’ Gala-days 211, I had a pleasant New-English feeling of self-gratulation. 1870 J. R. LOWELL Among my Bks. (1873) 1st Ser. 234 All their unconscious training by eye and ear, were New English wholly. 1969 William & Mary Q. 26 86 A loyal son of New English Puritanism who was forced as royal governor to carry out instructions specifically intended to remove the legal stanchions of the Congregational establishment. 1985 Amer. Lit. 57 327 The cross-fertilization between English and New English radical movements in the 1640s and 1650s.

B. n. With pl. concord. Inhabitants of New England. Obs.
1643 J. TRAPP Comm. Gen. iv. 23 A certaine Indian comming into a house of the New-English. 1647 N. WARD Simple Cobler Aggawam 3 Such as have given or taken any unfriendly reports of us New-English, should do well to recollect themselves.

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Posted: 12 September 2007 11:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I’m not going to say the OED is wrong and that “New English” is never used, but I’m with Dr. Techie on this one. “New Englander” or “New England” (adj., as in “New England Puritanism") would be more common by far.

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Posted: 12 September 2007 12:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Most, if not all, of the examples given in the OED either date from, or refer to, the colonial period, and the two where the context can’t be established (G Hamilton and JR Lowell) date from the 19th century. It may be that the word still enjoys a limited life in this specialist sense.

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Posted: 12 September 2007 02:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I was not disagreeing with Doc T (a dangerous occupation), just providing further information.  Had the question been “do you say...” or “do people generally say...” it would have been a different matter, but the question was specifically

Is New English used at all for things connected with New England?

To which the answer is an unequivocal “yes.” It is an uncommon usage, pretty much limited to discussing the Colonial period, and I was surprised the first time I encountered it, but there it is.

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Posted: 12 September 2007 02:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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And I’m not disagreeing with LH or the OED, but to illustrate how rare the term is, the AHD gives “New English” only as an alternative term for “Modern English”; on MWO it is not listed at all (except as part of the name of the New English Bible).

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