Entitlement tilt
Posted: 09 September 2014 11:31 PM   [ Ignore ]
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In other words, what happens when you start playing badly because you believe you’re bound to do better than obviously inferior opposition. It appears to be a poker term, but I’ve just read it being applied to chess (by someone who writes a lot about poker). It would seem to be applicable to any number of games or sports, but I’d never heard it before today. What about everyone else?

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Posted: 10 September 2014 02:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Tilt would seem to be poker slang for a lack of emotional control. It’s not just limited to entitlement, but can refer to any condition where a player is apt to take unwarranted risks. This site defines it as:

Tilt in poker occurs when you are unable to make rational decisions at the poker table because your emotional state has gotten the better of you. Perhaps you are angry at a bad beat, terrified because you just bought in with this month’s rent money, or got a promotion at work and feel like taking it easy on the table.

Wikipedia also has an entry, but it’s rather poorly written.

Tilt is in Green’s Dictionary of Slang where Green defines it as to raise the bet. The one citation is from Ring Lardner’s 1915 short story Alibi Ike, where Ike accidentally puts two dollars in the pot instead of one:

“Takeout a buck if you didn’t mean to tilt her,” says Carey.
“No,” says Ike, “I’ll leave it go.”

It’s used elsewhere in the story:

They was another pot that he come into with tens and fours. It was tilted a couple o’ times and two o’ the strong fellas drawed ahead of Ike.

It’s easy to see how tilt could shift from raising the bet to raising the bet on a bad hand to loss of emotional control.

I haven’t heard the term before, but I’m not a poker player.

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Posted: 10 September 2014 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Reminds me a term I recently learnt from 538: reverse clutch.

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Posted: 10 September 2014 07:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Huh, I’d never heard it either, and I’m glad to know about it; thanks for the post!

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Posted: 10 September 2014 07:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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First time I ever came across this interesting, pithy expression ("tilt" has always been associated in my mind with joggling pinball machines). Thank you, kurwamac.

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Posted: 20 September 2014 06:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Diegogarcity: on tilt is an answer in the NYT crossword for Sunday, 22 Sep. The clue is “suffering a losing streak, in poker.”

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Posted: 20 September 2014 11:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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In the light of recent happenings in Scotland, thought this to be appropriate (if my image-placing efforts work out):  didn’t; was rejected!

Sadly, the image exceeded the 75KB limit, so the impact is lost here.  So consolation prize - it is a cartoon from The New Yorker magazine depicting two traditionally dressed Scotsmen at a pinball machine which is indicating “KILT!”

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Posted: 22 September 2014 12:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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This one, I take it?

paint_zps84f9ad2e.jpg

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Posted: 22 September 2014 07:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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That’s it! Well done. Thanks.  It’s a bind being technically challenged. Shakespeare might have captioned it, “The Scottish Play.” ;-)

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Posted: 24 September 2014 08:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I have a nephew that “Tilts” toward the “Entitled”

Kidding aside… I’ve never heard of this phrase, but I’m not a poker player either.

I lost $20.00 at a neighbors “friendly game” and never looked back.

My Father used to mention “Tilting” referred to in jousting.

I looked up “Tilting at Windmills” which seems to use this jousting reference to “Fighting an unseen enemy”.

Perhaps the entitlement tilt as it referrers to poker is fighting an enemy that doesn’t exist (or ones self).

Or...I could be completely wrong. 8 )

This is an interesting site. I’m glad I found it.

This is my “First Post”, so please let me know if “I’m doing it wrong”.

8 )

Thomas

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Posted: 24 September 2014 03:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I looked up “Tilting at Windmills” which seems to use this jousting reference to “Fighting an unseen enemy”.

That’s a Don Quixote reference. The elderly, would-be knight thought that some windmills were giants and took them on in “battle.”

Tilt is indeed a jousting word, dating to the 16th century, a reference to the objective of knocking one’s opponent out of his saddle. Good guess, but in this instance I think it an unlikely origin for the poker term.

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Posted: 24 September 2014 05:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Although full tilt means charging at something wildly and recklessly, does it not? That’s a lot closer to entitlement tilt.

I’m not talking about the modern poker term, I mean “full tilt” as it was used in ye olden days, say 40 odd years ago, as in the wayback Janis Joplin era.

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Posted: 25 September 2014 02:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I’d forgotten about full tilt.

But the poker term originally meant simply to raise the bet. From there I would speculate the progression was to raise inadvisedly, then to play badly in general, then to the current sense of play badly because one’s emotional state had overtaken one’s rationality. I’m not sure how full tilt fits into that.

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