Syncope
Posted: 22 September 2007 10:25 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Just come across this lovely instance of syncope. Idolatry is from Latin idolatria, a shortened form of ecc. Latin idololatria.

I’m sure I recall other examples of this process but the wiki on Syncope isn’t very helpful. Can anyone think of others?

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Posted: 22 September 2007 11:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Would the popular first and sur- name “James” from Jakobo be an example?  The loss of the middle syllable happens in Late Latin as I remember.  Most languages keep the middle syllable (ko, go, què and etc.) This is OTTOMH. 

American version of Aluminum?  Or is that an example of a syllable being added to sound more scientific? 

I’m headed out the door to make apple pies with my grandson.

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Posted: 22 September 2007 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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ammeter?

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Posted: 22 September 2007 03:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Well, you live and learn (so long as you hang out on this board)! 

Having been brought up and spent much of my life working with doctors, syncope to me has always meant “reeling, writhing and fainting in coils”. I had no idea the word had any other meaning.

I may not be wiser, but I am certainly better informed.

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Posted: 22 September 2007 03:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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You should be able to find plenty of examples in the history of English, such as head < heafod; hawk < hafoc. Interestingly, English has harvest where German has the syncopated form Herbst.

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Posted: 22 September 2007 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Actually your original example could be considered to be haplology, one of my favourite words that illustrates itself (it should be haplogy). Not as egregious an example as morphophonology of course, try typing that 6 times fast.

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Posted: 22 September 2007 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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nomis - 22 September 2007 03:57 PM

You should be able to find plenty of examples in the history of English, such as head < heafod; hawk < hafoc. Interestingly, English has harvest where German has the syncopated form Herbst.

Brings to mind Lord. via etymonline:

M.E. laverd, loverd (13c.), from O.E. hlaford “master of a household, ruler, superior,” also “God” (translating L. Dominus, though O.E. drihten was used more often), earlier hlafweard, lit. “one who guards the loaves,” from hlaf “bread, loaf” + weard “keeper, guardian, ward.”

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Posted: 23 September 2007 12:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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nomis - 22 September 2007 04:07 PM

Actually your original example could be considered to be haplology, one of my favourite words that illustrates itself (it should be haplogy). Not as egregious an example as morphophonology of course, try typing that 6 times fast.

Wonderful word!

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Posted: 23 September 2007 06:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Actually, it doesn’t illustrate itself; if it were “haplogy” it would.  (We ling students used to call it that, of course.)

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Posted: 23 September 2007 05:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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languagehat - 23 September 2007 06:11 AM

Actually, it doesn’t illustrate itself; if it were “haplogy” it would.  (We ling students used to call it that, of course.)

Tough audience :) ... let’s say it potentially illustrates itself. Another potentially self-referential term is glottalisation (try saying it with a cockney accent).

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Posted: 24 September 2007 05:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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… let’s say it potentially illustrates itself

I’m sorry if I seem pedantic, but I don’t understand what you’re saying.  It doesn’t illustrate itself at all, even potentially.  Another, hypothetical, word would illustrate it.

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Posted: 24 September 2007 07:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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bosun for boatswain? foc’sle for forecastle? The English town of Mousehole is pronounced mouzle.
The surnames Featherstonehaugh (Fanshawe) and Cholmondeley (Chumley) are a bit different because you can’t detect the former in the latter?

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Posted: 24 September 2007 03:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Another, hypothetical, word would illustrate it.

If by “hypothetical word” you mean the form haplogy, then this must be where we’re at cross-purposes: I’m taking the view that haplogy is not hypothetical; people (e.g. ling students) produce it sometimes. haplogy illustrates the process of haplology; and to the extent that haplogy and haplology are (variants of) the same word, one can say that haplology illustrates itself.

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Posted: 26 September 2007 06:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Ellision is a good word to describe what venemousbede describes.

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