BL: Good Friday
Posted: 04 April 2015 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Another one I should have done long ago...

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Posted: 04 April 2015 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The dripping blood our only drink,
The bloody flesh our only food:
In spite of which we like to think
That we are sound, substantial flesh and blood—
Again, in spite of that, we call this Friday good.

T. S. Eliot “East Cocker”, “Four Quartets”

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Posted: 04 April 2015 06:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Interesting.  I always assumed it was “Good Friday” in the sense that the crucifixion was “good” for humanity (being the key to salvation).  But that also never felt quite right (and, as it turns out, it wasn’t).

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Posted: 04 April 2015 07:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I am given to understand that the god in godspell is related to the modern English word “good” and not to the modern English word “God”.

Is the sense of this god holy or positive?

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Posted: 04 April 2015 10:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thanks, Dave. A logical explanation for what to the uninformed, might seem an odd usage.

In Spanish it’s Viernes santo—“Holy Friday”.

A few years ago, I was travelling in California (where else?). That year, Easter and Passover coincided pretty exactly. I entered a supermarket --- the delicatessen counter was all dressed up with festive trimmings, and on the counter was a prominent sign: “Have a Happy Good Friday”. I moved further along the counter and there above the hams and sides of bacon was another, equally festive sign: “Have a Happy Passover”. Nothing if not ecumenical...... the only thing missing (it was the wrong time of year, but who cares --- business is business) was Io saturnalia!

;-)

(Edited to sharpen point)

[ Edited: 04 April 2015 10:21 PM by lionello ]
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Posted: 04 April 2015 10:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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lionello - 04 April 2015 10:15 PM

Thanks, Dave. A logical explanation for what to the uninformed, might seem an odd usage.

In Spanish it’s Viernes santo—“Holy Friday”.


A few years ago, I was travelling in California (where else?). That year, Easter and Passover coincided pretty exactly. I entered a supermarket --- the delicatessen counter was all dressed up with festive trimmings, and on the counter was a prominent sign: “Have a Happy Good Friday”. I moved further along the counter and there above the hams and sides of bacon was another, equally festive sign: “Have a Happy Passover”. Nothing if not ecumenical...... the only thing missing (it was the wrong time of year, but who cares --- business is business) was Io saturnalia!

;-)

(Edited to sharpen point)

Anagram of Australian, Oi!

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Posted: 05 April 2015 03:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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lionello - 04 April 2015 10:15 PM

… the only thing missing (it was the wrong time of year, but who cares --- business is business) was Io saturnalia!

There’s always Felicis Feriae Latinae

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Posted: 05 April 2015 05:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I am given to understand that the god in godspell is related to the modern English word “good” and not to the modern English word “God”.

Is the sense of this god holy or positive?

I’ve just added gospel to the Big List.

In this case, it’s not so clear that it is carries the ‘holy’ sense, although it very well might. It’s a calque of Latin and Greek.

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Posted: 05 April 2015 05:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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One quibble: you say ‘yom tov, a Yiddish alteration of the Hebrew yom (day) + tob (good)’. Yiddish transliteration is a minefield; the word turns up as yuntef[f] and yuntov and probably other things. But you seem to be implying that Yiddish is responsible for the change from B to V, and it isn’t. The standard transliteration of the Hebrew is yom tov. Some prefer yom tob, presumably on the grounds that the letter in question would have been a B if it weren’t a V; the two letters are distinguished by the presence or absence of a diacritical mark. But it’s not a very sensible transliteration.

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