BL: gospel
Posted: 05 April 2015 05:09 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Yet another religious term...

[ Edited: 06 April 2015 02:46 AM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 05 April 2015 05:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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How could you omit this?  (Also, you left the BL: off the title, which ruins the symmetry of a nice trifecta.)

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Posted: 24 April 2015 04:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Well done on this one, Dave!

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Posted: 25 April 2015 01:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I see that spell is cognate with the German spiel , a word which is still alive and well in English too. I’ve certainly heard and used it myself in the UK since at least the 60s.

Earliest cite in OED for spiel, n.2 is 1896, so I’m guessing this is a contribution from German- or Yiddish-speaking immigrants rather than a revival of English spell in its original sense. Here’s the OED entry:

spiel, n.2

Etymology:  < German spiel play, game; see also spiel v.

slang (orig. U.S.).

1. Talk, a story; a speech intended to persuade or advertise, patter. Also transf.

1896 G. Ade Artie xi. 100 There was a long spiel by the high guy in the pulpit.
1906 Daily Colonist (Victoria, Brit. Columbia) 25 Jan. 6/1 We appointed him mayor at five minutes’ notice and gave him the job of giving the Chinks the right kind of a spiel.
1925 P. G. Wodehouse Sam the Sudden xiii. 92 He pulled this long spiel about having had a letter from a guy he used to know named Finglass.

....................

1962 J. Wain Strike Father Dead 59, I gave her just the Christian name, and she gave me the spiel about never having met anybody called that before, and its being a nice name, and so forth.
a1974 R. Crossman Diaries (1975) I. 82 Then Callaghan started off with a long spiel which he read aloud from a Treasury brief on pale blue paper, describing the extreme gravity of the economic situation.
1980 Listener 13 Nov. 665/3 A long spiel..from a tart about how much horrider Soho has become.

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Posted: 11 May 2015 07:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I would only add to this excellent account that in the Septuaganit, εὐαγγέλια (evangelia) is used to translate the Hebrew word “besorah” בשורה usually translated as “good (or glad) tidings”. So the origin of “gospel” “good story” might go back to the OT.

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Posted: 12 May 2015 07:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Reb Wlm - 11 May 2015 07:55 PM

I would only add to this excellent account that in the Septuaganit, εὐαγγέλια (evangelia) is used to translate the Hebrew word “besorah” בשורה usually translated as “good (or glad) tidings”. So the origin of “gospel” “good story” might go back to the OT.

It certainly does as Handel made popular. “O Thou that tellest/bringeth good tidings to Zion.” He sees it as a specific foretelling of the NT “Good Tidings” or “Good News”. It is interesting, to me at least, that besorah is a noun but it is the verb form that is used in Isaiah 40. “To tell good tidings”. The Septuagint uses εὐαγγελιζόμενος at that point and Luke 8:1 uses that verb form as well.

Of further interest to me, as I travel this trail, is that the etymology of euagglia is , “good, well” (hence euphemism, eulogy etc) and angellō, “to announce”. An “angel” is more properly a messenger--one who announces.

edit: So, καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ ἄγγελος εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ἐγώ εἰμι Γαβριὴλ ὁ παρεστηκὼς ἐνώπιον τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ ἀπεστάλην λαλῆσαι πρὸς σὲ καὶ εὐαγγελίσασθαί σοι ταῦτα

Luke 1:19

The angel said to him, “I am Gabriel. I stand in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to tell you this good news.

Again a verb following Isaiah 40.

[ Edited: 12 May 2015 01:54 PM by Oecolampadius ]
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