Review: Curzan’s Secret Life of Words
Posted: 23 April 2015 05:18 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Well worth fifty bucks

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Posted: 24 April 2015 01:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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For me, the choice of title for the series is unfortunate. It reminds me of an advertising slogan I made up once. It was to be illustrated by a picture of a Hollywood diva in a bathing suit, looking virtuous and a little smug:

“The stars in their courses use T----X”.

The manufacturers didn’t buy it. I don’t know why..............

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Posted: 24 April 2015 01:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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“...the common practise to print the picture of a damsel—languishing, heroic, or coquettish—anyhow, a damsel on the jacket of every novel.”

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Posted: 24 April 2015 04:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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That sense of “course” is virtually unknown in US English.  It took me a while to figure out what you were getting at.

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Posted: 24 April 2015 11:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I doubt if it’s very much used nowadays in anybody else’s English, either; that makes it a fun word to bandy about.  BTW --- at a time long ago (when they still occasionally spoke to me), English girls sometimes referred to a period as “the curse”, not “the course”.  In Spanish and French, a menstrual period is commonly called “the rule” (la regla, la règle)

neat tie-in with that marvellous term blurb, Dave --- thanks!

[ Edited: 24 April 2015 11:42 PM by lionello ]
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Posted: 25 April 2015 04:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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While that sense of course isn’t in general use, the stars in their courses is a fossilized idiom and should be familiar.

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Posted: 25 April 2015 05:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Yes, the whole point of my failed jeu de mots was to use the fossilized idiom in an entirely unexpected context. But, as Dr. T makes clear, the allusion was too abstruse to be any good.

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Posted: 25 April 2015 08:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’ve not heard that usage.

I think the ad execs made the right call on this one…

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