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BL: dog
Posted: 12 May 2015 12:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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found it also as ‘docce”

http://bosworth.ff.cuni.cz/finder/3/docca
http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=dock&allowed_in_frame=0

I started looking for “dock” in relation to cutting the tail, common practice in such dogs.  But I think the “muscle” idea is perhaps more probable

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Posted: 12 May 2015 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I added to my post above; be sure to see it.

Bosworth-Toller is over 100 years old and shows its age. Wherever possible you should look to Toronto’s Dictionary of Old English. There is no such sense of any similar word in the DOE.

And Etymonline is a similarly questionable source—usually okay, but you wrong often enough that you need to verify anything you find there. Harper has this one wrong.

[ Edited: 12 May 2015 12:48 PM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 12 May 2015 01:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Can’t get to the Toronto dictionary without paid subscription.  I can only use what I can get to.  And “old English” is a lot closer to my description than any reference to my specialist knowledge…

However, many sources have similar words meaning short, bundled, related to tails.  So back to where I started.

Long shot and hard to in any way test, but IF the large dogs remained as a “speciality” and IF they cut the tails or bred then with short tails, could be that “docked hounds” shortened to “dogca”

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Posted: 13 May 2015 02:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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"Toad” derives from OE “tadige” (of unknown origin and unusual form) which has no known cognates in any other language.  OED suggests that it, too, could be another hypocoristic form with shortened vowel and doubled consonants.

Possibly “lugge” as in lugfish could be included as an example of a similar construction.  If these words are all hypocoristic, then I would guess that there are many other formerly common names in OE that were never written down, as stated in the article.  However, this is all pleasant speculation but doesn’t take us any further forward, tempting though it is.

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Posted: 14 May 2015 07:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Hi, Eliza!

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