Away
Posted: 28 April 2015 01:24 PM   [ Ignore ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3024
Joined  2007-01-30

As in, I cannot away with him, meaning I cannot abide or tolerate him. Is this usage still current anywhere? I was reminded of it by the following in Harington’s translation of Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, Bk 1, Canto 79

The liquor thus with secret venim mingled,
Makes her to stand so stiffely in the nay,
On whom Renaldos heart was wholy kindled,
Though scarce to looke on him she can away,
But from his sight desiring to be singled,
With soft low voice the Pagan she doth pray,
That he approch no nearer to this Knight,
But flie away with all the speed he might.

This sense is quite common in pre-20th century texts but I have a vague recollection of encountering it in modern dialect. Scots, maybe? Here’s the OED entry, unrevised since 1885 so not helpful, although it does mark use with the infinitive as obsolete.

away, adv.

16.

a. = Get on or along with, put up with; tolerate, endure, bear.

1477 J. Paston in Paston Lett. & Papers (2004) I. 505 My chargys be gretter than I maye a-weye wyth.
1526 Bible (Tyndale) Matt. xix. f. xxvjv, All men can not awaye with that saynge.
1530 J. Palsgrave Lesclarcissement 419/1, I agre with meate or drinke. I can away with it.
1587 A. Fleming et al. Holinshed’s Chron. (new ed.) III. 27/1 He..could well awaie with bodilie labour.
1606 G. W. tr. Justinus Hist. 85 b, They might enure themselues..to away with hardnesse and sparing.
1622 R. Sanderson Two Serm. Boston i. 58 He being the..Father of lies..cannot away with the Truth.
1642 Sir T. Browne Relig. Medici 98 Some..can with greater patience away with death.
1748 S. Richardson Clarissa IV. xxiii. 119 That saucy fleer, I cannot away with.
1841 T. Carlyle On Heroes iv. 195 Idolatry..is a thing they cannot away with.
1869 M. Arnold Culture & Anarchy (1882) 42 Jacobinism..cannot away with the inexhaustible indulgence proper to culture, the consideration of circumstances, etc.

†b. with inf. Obs.

1580 T. North tr. Plutarch Lives (1676) 183 Notwithstanding the People..could well away to live like Subjects.
1598 R. Bernard tr. Terence Andria i. ii, in Terence in Eng. 16 Men that be in loue, can ill away to haue wiues appointed them by others.

Anybody seen or heard this in modern usage?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2015 07:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4516
Joined  2007-01-29

This sense is quite common in pre-20th century texts

Really?  I’m pretty sure I’ve never encountered it, and I’ve read a lot of pre-20th century texts.  At any rate, I’ve certainly never seen or heard it in modern usage.  (It doesn’t appear to be Scots, judging by my Concise Scots Dictionary.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 April 2015 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2654
Joined  2007-02-19

Can’t say I’ve ever come across it, either.  Thanks, aldi. You have a knack for turning up far-out-of-the-way stuff!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 April 2015 02:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1512
Joined  2007-02-14

Why does the OED call it an adverb and then proceed to give it verb definitions?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 April 2015 03:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6327
Joined  2007-01-03

The definition (#16) is within this group:

IV. Elliptical uses, with a verb suppressed: simulating an imperative or (rarely) infinitive.

The dictionary is defining the entire verb phrase here, not just the adverb.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 May 2015 10:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  287
Joined  2007-02-15

Interesting expression, and no, I can’t say I use it either (Scots).

But it did remind me of a Dutch expression with ‘way’ as the central idea. It might slip someone’s attention as the Dutch (and Germans) often leave out the main verb in expressions, it being understood with a verbal phrase which only contains an auxiliary verb.

The one this reminded me of was ‘overweg kunnen met iemand’ (to get on with someone).

The archaic nature of the expression in English is similar: “he cannot away with someone”, the main verb ‘to go’ or ‘to travel’ being tacitly understood.

So the sense is “not being able to travel a(ny) way, distance, with someone”, figuratively not to get on with them.

Dutch etymological sources trace this verbal expression back a long way (end 15th C, some even further).

And the expression is current enough in modern Dutch as I had to learn it as well at some point.

Another English expression I was interested to find mirrored in modern Dutch was ‘onderweg’ (under way).

Hope this makes some kind of sense and I’m not just pointing out something that you were all aware of anyway?

[ Edited: 01 May 2015 10:23 AM by BlackGrey ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 May 2015 12:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  861
Joined  2007-06-20
BlackGrey - 01 May 2015 10:19 AM

Another English expression I was interested to find mirrored in modern Dutch was ‘onderweg’ (under way).

The OED says it’s the other way round, that English “under way” comes from Dutch onder, under, in the course of, etc. and weg, (dative plural wegen) way. Since we took so many nautical words from the Dutch, that seems highly likely.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 May 2015 01:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1617
Joined  2007-01-29

It may not be exactly the same sense as your first post, aldi, but here in north east England you’ll often hear someone say, “Away!” when they don’t believe what you said, eg, “It’s been really cold today.” “Away!” - possibly a shortened form of “Get away with you!”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 May 2015 01:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6327
Joined  2007-01-03

A week of returns. First the good Rebbe, and now Eliza. Welcome back!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 May 2015 02:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1617
Joined  2007-01-29

Thank you, kind sir.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 May 2015 07:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4516
Joined  2007-01-29

From me as well—it’s a real delight to see you here again!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 May 2015 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3466
Joined  2007-01-31

Hail, hail, the gang’s all here!

Welcome back to both Eliza and Reb Wlm!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 May 2015 01:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3024
Joined  2007-01-30

So good to see you back, Eliza!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 May 2015 06:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1617
Joined  2007-01-29

Thank you, everyone.  :)

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ BL: dog      Maypops, for off-brand shoes ››