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Posted: 01 October 2007 07:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I have not looked into this recently but when I was doing some serious library research I was able to purchase a university library card even though I was not a student. One university just gave me a card for a fee. Another university required me to donate to a non-profit called Friends of the Library or some such and then they gave me a card in appreciation for my donation. These were in Arizona and Utah respectively.

So, if one can access the OED with a university card and if one can find one of these schemes to give one a card then one should, perhaps, have OED access without fussing with the public library.

BTW, ask more than one person. The people working at the University of Utah library knew little or nothing about Friends of the Library. I learned of it via some alumni mailing which I go even though I was not an alumni.

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Posted: 01 October 2007 10:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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D Wilson - 30 September 2007 11:24 AM

I don’t see why the library would have anything to gain by this arrangement; I assume that the OED license prohibits off-site use;

OUP has a note about why the UK libraries have such access via a 2006 Landmark Agreement.

The examples in the US at least are pretty rare.  My local university has such access (through the World Wide Web) as they put it, but it is only for students and employees.  I’ll check if I can do what Droogie suggests.

My college alma mater in Virginia also offers Internet access for OED-online through the Virtual Library of Virginia sponsored by the state’s Council of Higher Education (their tax dollars at work as we say), but, alas, only to students and staff.  Colleges seem to pay a fee per FTE (I presume full time equivalent faculty, staff and students).  The fee seems to be in the $3,000 to $5,000 range. (edit: for the institution, not for each FTE).

Of the community public library systems which seem to have internet access to the OED I see

Seattle
Austin
San Diego (it’s a PDF, so I chose not to link it here.)
Skokie, IL
Mobile, Alabama
Cincinnati

and etc.

OUP offers a free trial for libraries.  Perhaps a visit to our local libraries could be helpful.

edit: for Dave’s benefit (I know he subscribes, but...) the San Fransisco library offers access to the OED for all state residents.

[ Edited: 01 October 2007 11:07 AM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 01 October 2007 12:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Note that while any California resident can get an SF Public Library card, you have to apply in person. This puts a practical limit on who can use it--you have to be within a reasonable distance of San Francisco. But if you are, it’s a great deal--show up once every two years to renew your card and you’ve got OED access for free. I presume that Oxford Univ. Press charges differently depending on whether libraries want to offer access to 1) library computers only or 2) online to library card holders. The SF Public Library also offers JSTOR access online (although access is limited to two people at a time) and a bunch of other subscription services.

Any California resident can also get a UC Berkeley library card by paying a $100 fee. But this does not include online access to the library’s subscription services (which include the OED, JSTOR, Lexis-Nexis, and much more). You have to be an enrolled student or faculty to get that--and I’ve found out that enrolling through the UC Extension program doesn’t count. I’m paying top dollar for my current course and I don’t have online access to the UC Berkeley Library systems. (I did get my library card for only $25, though.) So if I want access to the online services, I have to go on campus. (I can get them on my laptop providing I connect through the on-campus wifi network.)

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Posted: 02 October 2007 09:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Oecolampadius - 01 October 2007 10:46 AM

OUP has a note about why the UK libraries have such access via a 2006 Landmark Agreement.

Well not the UK, actually, only England, not Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland etc. and I don’t think it covers the whole of England either. English for the English, eh?

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Posted: 02 October 2007 12:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Thanks bayard.  Sloppy geographicalism on my part.  I generalized (wronglyl) from the uk in the urls.

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