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The whole Kit & Kaboodle
Posted: 21 February 2007 08:07 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Does anyone have any idea what a kaboodle is ?  I have actually seen something that was described as a kaboodle...it was a box that models used to sort/put their make up in, similar to a tackle box.....somehow I dont think any models know.  You know, when someone says the whole kit- n- kaboodle....I assume they mean the whole thing in it’s entirety.

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Posted: 21 February 2007 08:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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See the entry in Dave’s Big List.

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Posted: 21 February 2007 01:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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MissAlice - 21 February 2007 08:07 AM

it was a box ... similar to a tackle box…

A few years back (sometime in the 90’s), Kaboodle(TM) was the brand name of a line of plastic storage totes with multiple compartments usually sold at craft stores (Michael’s, Hobby Lobby, etc.) for carrying all the little fiddly bits for different crafts.  I think they also had a makeup division.  As far as I can tell from a quick search, the company has gone away, but it looks like the name has stuck.

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Posted: 22 February 2007 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think you’ve got the cause and effect reversed here, Myridon.  Kaboodle goes back way before the 1990s.

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Posted: 22 February 2007 08:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Faldage - 22 February 2007 04:55 AM

I think you’ve got the cause and effect reversed here, Myridon.  Kaboodle goes back way before the 1990s.

ARGHH!! The whole point of my post was exactly to point out that the usage of the word as applied to makeup cases was too recent to be the source.  I shall attempt to be more obvious in my next attempt.

(In case any one missed it, the purpose of this post is to explain to Faldage that I assumed everyone knew that I knew what I know in my last comment.) (^_^)

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Posted: 22 February 2007 01:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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ISTR “geboel” as a variant of the Dutch word “boedel” with the initial “ge-” added I believe as an intensifier or to make a word more generic. Dutchtoo would have to explain it. In any case, without evidence, it seems possible that “geboedel” could have been a precursor to “kaboodle”.

It should be explained that “oe” in Dutch is an “oo” sound in English and “g” is a hard velar fricative, a sound which the unitiated associate with the sound of clearing one’s throat.

[ Edited: 22 February 2007 09:41 PM by foolscap ]
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Posted: 22 February 2007 04:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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jimgorman - 22 February 2007 11:32 AM

I took your post to mean what you now say it means.

Too subtle for me.  I still don’t see it.

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Posted: 22 February 2007 06:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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As I read it, Myridon was suggesting that the usage Miss Alice describes (using “kaboodle” as a generic term to refer to a compartmented box for carrying makeup or whatnot) derives from the use of the word as a brand name for just such a box, WHICH IN TURN was likely inspired by the much older phrase “kit and kaboodle” (this last point being sufficiently obvious that he didn’t feel it needed to be mentioned explicitly).

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Posted: 23 February 2007 05:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Dr. Techie - 22 February 2007 06:10 PM

As I read it, Myridon was suggesting that the usage Miss Alice describes (using “kaboodle” as a generic term to refer to a compartmented box for carrying makeup or whatnot) derives from the use of the word as a brand name for just such a box, WHICH IN TURN was likely inspired by the much older phrase “kit and kaboodle” (this last point being sufficiently obvious that he didn’t feel it needed to be mentioned explicitly).

A-a-a-a-a-h.  Now I get it.

I guess sufficiently obvious to those of sufficient mental acumen.

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Posted: 23 February 2007 07:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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ISTR “geboel” as a variant of the Dutch word “boedel” with the initial “ge-” added I believe as an intensifier or to make a word more generic. Dutchtoo would have to explain it. In any case, without evidence, it seems possible that “geboedel” could have been a precursor to “kaboodle”.

Afrikaans “boedel” means “estate”.  Afrikaans uses the ge- prefix in two ways*: one - to form the gerund, where English would use “-ing” as in “bundling” from the verb “bundle” (which may or may not be related to “boedel"); and two - to denote a (slightly irritating) continuous action, as in “gewarrel”, meaning commotion.

*apart from denoting the past tense, that is.

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Posted: 24 February 2007 10:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Your reasoning seems to cut wood, Foolscap, except that I am a bit puzzled by that ‘geboedel’. Normally the prefix ‘ge-’ would only be found in combination with a verb. For Dutch the same reasoning would apply as explained by Eliza for Afrikaans.

‘Boedel’ means ‘assets, property’ and knows a variant ‘boel’ meaning ‘(a) lot’. I can find no ‘geboel’ or ‘geboedel’. Even the online Woordenboek der Nederlandse Taal doesn’t know it (actually it mentions under ‘boedel’: “a verb boedelen has so far not been found"). On the Internet I can find only one instance of ‘geboedel’, surprisingly on an Afrikaans website (webwerf). Nice detail: it’s a rugby fans forum in which people use both Afrikaans and English.

Here it seems to be used in the sense of “the whole lot”. Come to think of it, maybe the author used it as an “Afrikanization” of ‘kaboodle’, but that’s just guessing.

Bundel is not related; that comes from ‘binden’ (to bind).

[ Edited: 24 February 2007 10:55 AM by Dutchtoo ]
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Posted: 24 February 2007 08:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I am a bit puzzled by that ‘geboedel’. Normally the prefix ‘ge-’ would only be found in combination with a verb. For Dutch the same reasoning would apply as explained by Eliza for Afrikaans.

Well, Dutchtoo, I have to admit I’m relying on some very dim memories here and my Dutch dictionary is packed away. I’ll have to check out the big dictionary you have referenced. Which reminds me, do the Dutch still comment on the problem of a “pig in the brook”?.

Anyway, are there not some Dutch nouns formed with the “ge-” as Eliza has indicated? For some reason the only one that pops into my head is “gezeik”, perhaps because I heard it so often. As I recall, It’s a good parallel to “BS” as we Americans are so fond of saying.

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Posted: 25 February 2007 03:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Ah, memories of my earliest schooldays: “the pig stands stiff in the brook”. Was humor ever that simple?

For the rest: that phrase is a kind of mock-English for Dutch “de pik staat stijf in de broek” which means ‘having a hard-on’. ‘Broek’ is Dutch for trousers (cf. breeches). There is also (now obsolete) Dutch ‘broek’ meaning ‘wetlands, marsh’ which is cognate to the English word. Nowadays it is hardly ever recognized. Actually the coat of arms of the village of Abbenbroek is showing a pair of trousers!
(phew, so glad I could give this one an etymological twist)

perhaps because I heard it so often
Makes one wonder why ;-)

But seriously: nouns formed with ge- are, to my knowledge, always derived from verbs. ‘gezeik’ is from ‘zeiken’ (to nag). ‘geboedel’ would require a verb ‘boedelen’ which doesn’t seem to exist.

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Posted: 25 February 2007 08:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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There are two ge- prefixes in Germanic: the first used to form past participles from verbal stems and the other for forming nomina collectiva from other nouns. Examples in German of the latter are: Gebrüder ‘brothers’, Gemüse ‘vegetables; legumes’ (from Mus ‘mush; puls‘; cf. Middle Dutch gemôse, but Dutch groente), Gemüt ‘mind’ from Mut ‘courage, bravery’ (cf. Dutch gemoed ‘soul’ and moed ‘courage’, English mood), Gebäume ‘Bäume zusammen’ (archaic, entry in Wtbch Grimm). It’s probably that the prefix is no longer productive in Dutch and these traces are historical. The prefix ge- is thought by some to be cognate with Latin com-.

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Posted: 25 February 2007 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Which confirms what I said earlier in my reply about Afrikaans. 

Nobody listens to a word I say here, either.  Some things never change.

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Posted: 25 February 2007 10:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Well, all right, then ...

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