Inventing Languages
Posted: 31 October 2015 05:31 AM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6323
Joined  2007-01-03

A long, but quite good, talk on the subject

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 November 2015 07:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  287
Joined  2007-02-15
Dave Wilton - 31 October 2015 05:31 AM

A long, but quite good, talk on the subject

Thanks Dave, that was a fascinating waste of an hour :)

Nice to hear pretty much pure theory without wasting time on practice and reality…

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 November 2015 03:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6323
Joined  2007-01-03

In a way, it’s all practice and reality. After all, Dothraki and Klingon are real languages, as real as Esperanto. They’re just not “natural languages.” And the practice is how to invent a language that appears to be natural.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 November 2015 05:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  287
Joined  2007-02-15
Dave Wilton - 04 November 2015 03:45 AM

In a way, it’s all practice and reality. After all, Dothraki and Klingon are real languages, as real as Esperanto. They’re just not “natural languages.” And the practice is how to invent a language that appears to be natural.

Yeah, but given that the made-up lingos are mainly passioned or professional jobs and that they have not been created and honed by hundreds and thousands of generations of humans; that you will be very lucky indeed if these non-natural (=artificially created) languages have more than a couple of hundred root words and nary an exception to a noun declension or verb conjugation amongst ‘em.

In short, re-inventing the lingual wheel for Disney for money is worth it if you get the gig. Doing it as a crazy pointless youthful hobby is worthy of a video every now and then I guess.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2015 05:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6323
Joined  2007-01-03

That’s true for Dothraki, but Klingon is not a professionally created language. It’s largely the result of the Star Trek fan base building upon a kernel of vocabulary and grammar created by the movie producers.

that you will be very lucky indeed if these non-natural (=artificially created) languages have more than a couple of hundred root words and nary an exception to a noun declension or verb conjugation amongst ‘em

That’s probably true for the vast majority, which are languages which no one has ever heard of. But the ones we’re talking about, Klingon and Dothraki for instance, don’t fall into this category.

a crazy pointless youthful hobby

I’m not saying that such exercises will solve global warming or end world hunger, but they’re not pointless. (And not always youthful, either.) Inventing such languages is a good way to explore the complexity of language, to understand how the different aspects interact with one another (e.g., how phonetics influences etymology). It’s not a replacement for the formal, traditional study of natural languages, but it’s a useful adjunct.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2015 08:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4514
Joined  2007-01-29

a crazy pointless youthful hobby

He has a crazy pointless youthful hobby; you have a weird but harmless side interest; I have an intellectually stimulating avocation.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2015 01:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1510
Joined  2007-02-14
languagehat - 15 November 2015 08:18 AM

He has a crazy pointless youthful hobby; you have a weird but harmless side interest; I have an intellectually stimulating avocation.

You’re channeling some old Chicago newspaper columnist.  Irv Kupcinet?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2015 06:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3986
Joined  2007-02-26

I thought he was channeling Sir Humphrey Appleby.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 November 2015 03:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1510
Joined  2007-02-14

Irv Kupcinet predates Sir Humphrey by a few decades. He was the first from whom I saw the snowclone “He is X; you are Y; I am Z” where X, Y and Z are successively kinder descriptions of some activity.

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Wolverine plays Hold'em      graduand ››