camouflaged technology
Posted: 06 October 2007 09:01 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Slate has a piece on the history of vibrators in which they use the cited phrase in the following

From the 1950s through the 1970s, the vibrator became what academics like to call a camouflaged technology. Mail-order catalogs full of household tchotchkes featured beautiful women with long, silky hair loosening their tight shoulder muscles with banana-shaped vibrators. Also popular were vibrators that doubled as nail-buffer kits, hair brushes, backscratchers, and some that were designed as attachments for vacuum cleaners.

Google likes to drop the letter “d” at the end of camouflaged.

but there is this “nl” page which offer something about the fermette a ‘farm-style house’ which seems rural, but actually is no such thing.

But the Slate piece seems to suggest that the item is camouflaged in a way that disguises its real purpose.

Is there agreement about this term?  It seems useful, but I don’t have clarity about its definition.

edit: most of the uses of this term are about either the fermette or vibrators.

[ Edited: 06 October 2007 09:03 PM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 07 October 2007 03:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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You get significantly more hits for camouflage-technology than for camouflaged-technology probably because you are getting a lot of hits for the technology that produces camouflage, which are irrelevant to the question of disguising the use of common household objects.

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Posted: 08 October 2007 08:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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A close friend who thinks he might have read men’s magazines when he was a teenager in the ‘70s tells me of a device, clearly a vibrator, which ads showed caressing a woman’s face and it was called The Non Doctor. He thinks it may have been in mainstream mags, too, and it was marketed as relieving headaches and facial stress, neck pains, etc.

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Posted: 08 October 2007 10:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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A popular mail order catalogue, specialising in house hold products, that was distributed here in the 60s and 70s also advertised them, showing a women holding one against her cheeck and calling it a ‘massagestaaf’ (massage bar).

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Posted: 11 October 2007 07:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Identical product, I’ll wager, Dutchtoo lol. Sleek and black with chrome bit beneath the ‘glans’. Massage bar is closer than Non Doctor to the real function and this was after the Lady Chatterley trial in the UK.

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