BL: fascism, fascist
Posted: 01 December 2015 06:54 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Figurative use is older than I suspected

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Posted: 02 December 2015 03:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The US winged liberty head dime (1916-1945) featured a fasces on the reverse.  Apologies for not providing a link but this laptop won’t do copy and paste.  See the Wikipedia page on Dime (United States coin).

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Posted: 03 December 2015 07:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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A good entry, but you’ve telescoped the early history in a somewhat confusing way.  Since it cost me some effort to do the research that resulted in the “fascist” article in the 2008 (and, alas, final) edition of Safire’s Political Dictionary, I’ll reproduce the relevant passage here:

Fascio is the Italian word for “bundle, group.” Radical workers’ organizations called fasci dei lavoratori were common in Sicily in the 1880s, joining together in the early 1890s as a political group called Fasci siciliani before being suppressed by the government. In 1914 Benito Mussolini created the militaristic Fasci d’azione rivoluzionaria, called the “Milan fascio,” whose members were called fascisti, and in 1919 he reconstituted it as the Fasci italiani di combattimento, transformed in 1921 into a political party, the Partito Nazionale Fascista. The movement grew in the early twenties as an especially brutal alternative to Communism, and under Mussolini controlled Italy from 1922 to 1943.

Note that Mussolini was using it as early as 1914.

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Posted: 03 December 2015 08:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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fasci dei lavoratori

At first glance, this conjured up the image of people who were were militantly dictatorial on the question of whether the toilet paper should go over or under.

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Posted: 03 December 2015 10:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I thought it was because one of their favourite methods of arguing with dissidents was to force-feed them castor oil

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Posted: 04 December 2015 08:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’d guess that the Sicilian workers’ organisations named themselves in reference to the ancient fable of The Old Man and his Sons, rather than directly to the fasces of the Roman Republic?

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Posted: 04 December 2015 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Dr. Techie - 03 December 2015 08:11 AM

fasci dei lavoratori

At first glance, this conjured up the image of people who were were militantly dictatorial on the question of whether the toilet paper should go over or under.

:)

I must say the term would also fit well some of the public loo attendants of my remembrance, old men who would sit scowling on their stools, ever watchful that pennies were being dropped into appropriate slots and no shenanigans were going on. Some of them in the big railway stations in London like Waterloo would also have saucers on the table for the reception of gratuities, although why anybody would tip them and for what reason is beyond me.

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Posted: 05 December 2015 12:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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for shame, aldi.

If I had to be a public loo attendant, I think I’d spend a lot of my time scowling, too, and making damn sure nobody dodged payment.

I watch you as you enter, all in haste
To dump your pressing load of body waste.
Soon, out you come, all eager to repair
Back to your world of sunshine and fresh air —
Whilst I, like Cerberus, watch here in Hell,
Breathing that awful piss-and-Lysol smell.
My work is dreary, thankless, and ignoble —
Would you begrudge me, then, my paltry obol?

(edited to correct punctuation)

[ Edited: 05 December 2015 01:05 AM by lionello ]
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Posted: 05 December 2015 12:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Brilliant, lionello. I had to look up obol - six of them made a drachma, for the minority of the similarly uninformed. Dr Techie, our house supports under-achievers.

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Posted: 05 December 2015 01:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Having spent many an idle moment wrestling with the question of ‘over or under,’ I’ve concluded that toilet protocol (based on logic) demands that it be ‘over,’ provided that the crapper is not located in a place where pet cats or puppies have a roll to play.

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Posted: 05 December 2015 03:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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My contribution to the toilet paper roll war is that over and under are not the correct terms.  It’s in front or in back.

[ Edited: 05 December 2015 01:54 PM by Faldage ]
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Posted: 05 December 2015 06:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Faldage - 05 December 2015 03:27 AM

My contribution to the toilet paper roll war is that over andunder are not the correct terms.  It’s in front or in back.

That seems like a different war but I do realise modern warfare is complex.

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Posted: 05 December 2015 08:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Bravo, Lionello!

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