BL: carol
Posted: 16 December 2015 07:50 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Some surprising connections

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Posted: 16 December 2015 03:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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‘Ding Dong Merrily on High’ is a carol in both the original and the modern senses. The words were written by the English composer George Ratcliffe Woodward (1848–1934), and first published in 1924 to a dance tune he found in a late 16th-century collection of French dances by one Thoinot Arbeau, where it was titled ’Branle de L’Official‘ or ‘the household servants’ dance’.

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Posted: 16 December 2015 07:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It is interesting that this caroling was done outside the church and led by women from the beginning. From the 1303 quote in Dave’s translation

(These women went and enticed her out to carol with him about the church. Beune ordained their caroling; Gerlew wrote what they should sing: this is the carol that they sung, as told in the Latin tongue.)

It sounds to me that this was a lay led and in many cases women led adventure. Not sure what is meant by “as told in the Latin tongue” means here. The sense I have is that this sort of frivolity was not sanctioned by the church [what does “Beune ordained” mean] but was done in villages and “about” the church and not in it.

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Posted: 16 December 2015 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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… this is the carol that they sung, as told in the Latin tongue.

... Not sure what is meant by “as told in the Latin tongue” means here.

The quoted line is followed by a Latin translation of the carol.

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Posted: 17 December 2015 06:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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The early use of the word to mean a ring dance also gives us another modern word, the library carrel.

OK, that blew my mind.

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Posted: 17 December 2015 06:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yeah, I was floored by that one. Never expected it.

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Posted: 19 December 2015 04:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Wow, didn’t see that one coming.

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Posted: 20 December 2015 02:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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another modern word, the library carrel.

All very well, for you scholarly bibliovermes. I had to look “carrel” up, and consequently learned a new word. I was also driven to pursue the etymologies of words with similar sounds (carouse, carousel), but, as it transpires, very different origins. Thanks to Dave for an entertaining and instructive post, and to the commentators; all together, you make this a richly rewarding forum

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