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Shitload
Posted: 10 October 2007 11:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Before he gets cross with you for ignoring him and with me for taking the credit that should be his, zythophile said shitload was a euphemism for shedload.  In the north of England we call a machine that spreads muck, oddly enough, a muck spreader.  See this wiki article.  According to this, in 1891 Joseph Oppenheim and Henry Synck of Ohio used the first mechanical muck spreader.

[ Edited: 10 October 2007 11:55 AM by ElizaD ]
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Posted: 10 October 2007 12:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Yeah, but he’s never thrown slippers at me for failing to pay due attention to what he had said.

He’s the good company you’re in.

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Posted: 10 October 2007 01:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Like I said, Oppenheim and Synck used the first mechanical muck spreader, but The Good Doctor does their quality control checks.

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Posted: 11 October 2007 02:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Perhaps a little tangential, but I remember laughing whenever this kind of report came on the news: “The lorry shed its load all over the motorway”

To ‘shit your load’ was our S Scots term for being hugely scared.

I also used ‘shedloads’ often when younger in Scotland with same meaning as mentioned previously here.

‘Shitloads’ to me was the term the more cool kids used, the ones who weren’t afraid to swear openly (halcyon days indeed!)

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Posted: 11 October 2007 08:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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The ballad singer James Blunt (now also rhyming slang) has the piss taken for using ‘shipload’ in a Guardian review by Alex Petridis:

“Nevertheless, Give Me Some Love offers further evidence of the effect the opprobrium has had on the singer. It seems to have brought on a debilitating attack of dyslexia. “Won’t you give me some love?” he sings, adding bafflingly: “I’ve taken shipload of drugs.” Perhaps a shipload is like a shitload, only bigger, evocative of the vast container vessels that sail the world’s seas. Perhaps he’s substituted the letter t with p for reasons of probity: this is, after all, an artist beloved of censorious Middle England. Or perhaps his detractors are right and it doesn’t mean anything. Perhaps it’s just a crock of ship.”

It’s all about radio airplay I reckon, in this case.

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Posted: 11 October 2007 08:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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To ‘shit your load’ was our S Scots term for being hugely scared.

Thus “keep a tight ass-hole” which, was and possibly still is a sort of gallows good wishes to soldiers preparing for battle.

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Posted: 11 October 2007 10:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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I wonder how many rival politicians and media commentators currently accusing (the UK Prime Minister) Gordon Brown of having “lost his bottle” and “bottled out” (for declining to call a general election after the Conservatives gained in the opinion polls) realise they’re using Cockney rhyming slang for “lost his arse/ass-hole”, that is, evacuated his bowels in fear - bottle = bottle’n’glass = arse.

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Posted: 11 October 2007 10:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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The OED is doubtful of that derivation.

This use prob. derives from the phrase no bottle ‘no good, useless’ (sense 1g(a) above). It is however often popularly associated with the rhyming slang term bottle and glass = ‘arse’ and other similar expressions.

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Posted: 12 October 2007 12:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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The Oxford Dictionary of Slang, however, seems slightly less willing to dismiss the “arse” derivation than its big parent, repeating “probably ... no bottle, no good, useless”, then going on to say

but often popularly associated with rhyming slang bottle and glass arse, and other similar expressions, perhaps with the connotation (in the phrase ‘lose one’s bottle") of the temporary incontinence associated with extreme fear.

Certainly the first citation in the “big” OED seems to have the “lost your arse” sense:

1958 F. NORMAN Bang to Rights 62 We all began to ask each other..why he hadn’t made a dash for it. ‘What’s the matter Frank, your bottle fallen out?

But if you did lose your bottle, would it be a fiasco? <hem hem>

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Posted: 11 June 2009 09:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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I, too, would have taken shedload or shipload to be a polite form of the very familiar shitload.

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Posted: 12 June 2009 03:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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SHITLOAD n.” so Eliza is in good company (as always) in entertaining that explanation (The good doctor)

Er… thank you ... I think ...

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Posted: 25 May 2014 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Dr. Techie - 08 October 2007 10:44 AM

“Shitload” is cited from 1962, “assload" not at all, and “butt-load” is mentioned only once, from 1796, as an example of the dialect use of “butt” to mean a cart.  I think that the modern “assload” and “buttload” postdate “shitload” and might have arisen as euphemisms of it.

One might have expected an early sense of “ass-load” = as much as an ass (donkey) can carry, but the OED, at least, has no examples of this.  Edit: I did, however, find two mid-19th century examples at MOA.

According to David McCullough’s biography of John Adams, ass-load was used in 1789 by Representative John Page of Virginia in this verse describing John Adams:

I’ll tell in a trice--
‘Tis old Daddy Vice
Who carries of pride an ass-load;
Who turns up his nose,
Wherever he goes,
With vanity swelled like a toad.

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Posted: 26 May 2014 04:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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If the verse is authentic (and I certainly wouldn’t take David McCullough’s word for it).

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Posted: 26 May 2014 11:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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From The History Of the Late Rebellion: With Original Papers, And The Characters ... by Robert Patten, 1717, p. 24:

link https://encrypted.google.com/books?id=oGxYAAAAcAAJ&dq=&#x22;ass%20load&#x22;&pg=PA24#v=onepage&q=&#x22;ass%20load&#x22;&f=false

Edited to add:

...A warrant for Mr. Forster’s apprehension having been sent forth, he was, like Lord Derwentwater, obliged to fly from place to place, until he arrived at the house of Mr. Fenwick, at Bywell. Lord Derwentwater, meantime, had been secreted under the roof of a man named Lambert, in a cottage, where he had remained in safety. His horses had been seized by one of the neighbouring magistrates, and had been detained in custody for several weeks, pursuant to an order in council; yet, when he had need of them they were returned. “I afterwards asked that lord,” Mr. Batten relates, “how he came so quietly by his horses from the justice’s possession, whom the believing neighbourhood esteemed a most rigid Whig. I was answered thus, by that lord’s repeating a saying of Oliver Cromwell’s, ‘ that he could gain his ends with an ass load of gold,’ and left me to make the application."…

link http://www.electricscotland.com/history/jacobites/chapter03.htm

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658)
James Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Derwentwater (26 June 1689 – 24 February 1716)
(both above dates via wikipedia)

If Cromwell indeed said it, one should be able to place it at least by 1658.

[ Edited: 26 May 2014 11:39 AM by sobiest ]
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Posted: 27 May 2014 04:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Excellent find!

(Is the software able to receive my submission at this time?)

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